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I'm working on a concent to show the thumbnail of a large number of images from the local drive.

With HTML5 File API is seems quite possible, but whn I try to load a big number of images the memory usage of the browser goes over the roof and the collapses.

I think the problem is that the FileReader doesn't releases the memory after a file read.

Originally I had a new instance of FileReader and a simple loop to iterate through the images.

To solve this memory problem I replaced this to have one FileReader only, but it did not really help.

Here is the relevand code block:

<script>

var areader = new FileReader();
var counter=0;

function loadImage(file) {
    var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
    areader.onload = function (event) {
        var img = new Image;

        img.onload = function () {
            canvas.width = img.width / 100;
            canvas.height = img.height / 100;
            var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
            ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0, img.width / 100, img.height / 100);
            var browse = document.getElementById("uploadInput");
            if (browse.files.length > counter) {
                counter++;
                areader.result = null;//I don't think this makes any difference
                loadImage(browse.files[counter]);
            }
        };

        img.src = event.target.result;
    };
    areader.readAsDataURL(file);
    preview.appendChild(canvas);
}

function showImages() {
    loadImage(document.getElementById("uploadInput").files[0]);

}

If anybody come across this problem the I do something very stupid could you reply.

Thanks,

Tamas

share|improve this question
    
How many images are we talking about here? –  Pointy Nov 18 '12 at 17:37
    
And how big are the images, too? Is this a problem in all browsers or just one? –  Sean Redmond Nov 18 '12 at 17:50

2 Answers 2

It's not the file reader but you are using the entire image's data in base64 as the src property of the image, which will actually take 133% of the image's size in memory.

You should use Blob URLs instead:

var URL = window.URL || window.webkitURL;

function loadImage( file ) {
    var canvas = document.createElement("canvas"),
        img = new Image();

    img.onload = function() {
        canvas.width = img.width / 100;
        canvas.height = img.height / 100;
        var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
        ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0, img.width / 100, img.height / 100);
        URL.revokeObjectURL( img.src );
        img = null;

        var browse = document.getElementById("uploadInput");
            if (browse.files.length > counter) {
            counter++;
            loadImage(browse.files[counter]);
        }
    };
    img.src = URL.createObjectURL( file );

    preview.appendChild(canvas);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even then, the browser has to keep the pixel information for all the images, no? –  Pointy Nov 18 '12 at 17:37
    
@Pointy well yea but you can throw the img away after .drawImage –  Esailija Nov 18 '12 at 17:37
    
Yes but it's got to keep the pixels available because at any time the code may ask for them back via the canvas API. At least, it seems so to me. –  Pointy Nov 18 '12 at 17:46
    
@Pointy in this example only the pixels in canvas are kept in memory, not the entire image and not to mention also the entire image duplicated as base64. drawImage doesn't make any references to the image, it copies the image's pixels to the canvas. –  Esailija Nov 18 '12 at 17:52
1  
@Pointy Oh and also, javascript string characters take 2 bytes. So having the image binaries as 64 base encoded string in .src property would actually take 266% of the image's size as memory, yes? :p –  Esailija Nov 18 '12 at 18:09

I have tried your suggestion. It makes good sence and maybe it eats up the memory a bit slower, but at the end this solution also allocates all the physycal memory and kills the browser.

My goal is to be able to load few hundreds of local images as thumbnails and the images will be most likely 4-5 Mb digital camera images. Loading and resizing this big images probably will need a reasonable amount of memory, but once the initial image is destructed and only the thumbnail is kept in a canvas it should be fearly small.

So I think there ara two possibilities: -The Image tags meory footpring if not released. -The "ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0, img.width / 100, img.height / 100);" command doesn't really do proper resizing,it holds the whole image instead.

This issue happend in both the latest Firefox and Crome.

Let me know if you have any tip. I start to think that thi is just a limitaiton of the current HTML5 implementations. I don't know about any site which offers this, viewing the thumbnails of a large amount of local images without uploading.

EDIT:

Here is the full code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>File(s) size</title>
<script>

var myURL = window.URL || window.webkitURL;
 var areader = new FileReader();
 var counter = 0;
 var img = new Image();

function loadImage(file) {
    var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
    img = new Image();
    console.log(file);
    img.src = myURL.createObjectURL(file);
    img.onload = function () {
        canvas.width = img.width / 50;
        canvas.height = img.height / 50;
        var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
        ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0, img.width, img.height, 0, 0, img.width / 50, img.height / 50)
        myURL.revokeObjectURL(img.src);
        img = null;

        var browse = document.getElementById("uploadInput");
        if (browse.files.length-1 > counter) {
            counter++;
            loadImage(browse.files[counter]);
        }
    };

    preview.appendChild(canvas);
}

function showImages() {
    loadImage(document.getElementById("uploadInput").files[0]);

}

</script>
</head>

<body >
<form name="uploadForm">
<p><input id="uploadInput" type="file" name="myFiles" onchange="showImages();" multiple> selected files: <span id="fileNum">0</span>; total size: <span id="fileSize">0</span></p>
<div id="preview"></div>
</form>
</body>

Thanks, Tamas

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't really do proper resizing,it holds the whole image instead. ah yes... try this ctx.drawImage( img, 0, 0, img.width, img.height, 0, 0, img.width / 100, img.height / 100 ) –  Esailija Nov 20 '12 at 11:50
    
I'm affraid it didn't help. The optional source image parameters in the drawImage didn't make any difference. –  sneci Nov 20 '12 at 13:36
    
worked for me in jsfiddle :/ –  Esailija Nov 20 '12 at 13:39
    
I edited the post and added the whole html file. In jsfiddle it does the same to me as in a normal browser....it looks all fine for 10-20 images, but if you open 50-100 big size images the mem usage goes crasy. Did you tested in a similar way? –  sneci Nov 20 '12 at 14:48
    
You probably need to give it some time to release the other memory, the full image still needs to be temporarily held in memory but it should go down after a while –  Esailija Nov 20 '12 at 14:54

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