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I'm trying to have a bunch of operation executed on different targets such as ARM,Bfin... but every time I write a simple code in C and then compile it for each operation it has like 2 loads and one store which is unnecessary for every operation.

    ldr     r2, [fp, #-24]
    ldr     r3, [fp, #-28]
    add     r3, r2, r3
    str     r3, [fp, #-20]
    ldr     r2, [fp, #-36]
    ldr     r3, [fp, #-40]
    add     r3, r2, r3
    str     r3, [fp, #-32]
    ldr     r2, [fp, #-44]
    ldr     r3, [fp, #-48]
    add     r3, r2, r3
    str     r3, [fp, #-20]
    ldr     r3, [fp, #-16]
    add     r3, r3, #1
    str     r3, [fp, #-16]

When I turn on any optimization options, even -O1, it simply calculates the result and stores it in the output:

    subl    $24, %esp
    movl    $4, 4(%esp)
    movl    $.LC0, (%esp)

Is there anyway,I can have operations without fetching the same variable over and over again? I've tried gcc -fgcse-lm and -fgcse-sm but that didn't work.

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1  
If the operation can be reduced to the simple code, why do you want any more complex code? Ultimately, if it matters, you can drop down into assembler. But I can't think of a reason I'd want something longer than the optimized code if the optimized code produces the same result. If something must be read when referenced in the code, you could perhaps mark it volatile. But that's icky and may not achieve what you want anyway. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 18 '12 at 17:39
    
the C language doesn't really support the inclusion of assembly code directly inside the source code ( it's not standard but it's a suggested feature ), but in reality many compilers support this feature, you can just code a function in C and define it in assembly if you care so much to the performances and you are able to use the assembly language. –  user1824407 Nov 18 '12 at 17:51
    
thanks,I needed a long function full of same operation to be able to find average delay of that operation in a target processor.anyway I wanted to avoid writing assembly but it looks like I have to in some point. –  user1833939 Nov 18 '12 at 19:44
    
@user1833939 You should ask what you want. You wanted to to some benchmarking and your problem seems to be the compiler does optimize away your code. Just guessing, since you didn't actually write that. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 19 '12 at 11:02

2 Answers 2

It depends on the operation. Gcc can't figure out a high level optimizations for

int a(int b, int c)
{
  b-=c;
  c-=b;
  b-=c;
  c-=b;
  b-=c;
  c-=b;
  return c;
}
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If you want to do benchmarking and avoid constant folding and dead code elimination of the optimizer in gcc, you need to use non-constants as input and make sure the result goes somewhere.

For instance, instead of using

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int a = 1;
    int b = 2;

    start_clock();
    int c =  a + b;
    int d =  c + a;
    int e =  d + b;
    stop_clock();
    output_time_needed();

    return 0;
}

You should use something like

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int a = argc;
    int b = argc + 1;

    start_clock();
    int c =  a + b;
    int d =  c + a;
    int e =  d + b;
    stop_clock();
    output_time_needed();

    return e;
}
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