Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What should my regular expression look like if I want to validate that $/Folder1/Folder2/Folder3/File.xml always starts with $ and always ends with xml

"$/Folder1/Folder2/Folder3/File.xml"
Pass

"$/Folder1/Folder2/Folder3/File.xm"
Fail

"$/Folder1/Folder2/Folder3/File.py"
Fail

"A/Folder1/Folder2/Folder3/File.xml"
Fail

Edit... So... The right regular expression is...

"^\$.*xml$"

The the method after the implementation of the regex checker looks like...

public bool ValidateConfigPath(string config)
    {
        var match = Regex.Match(config, @"^\$.*xml$", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

        return match.Success;
    }

And all my unit tests pass...

[TestMethod]
    public void ValidateConfigPath_InCorrect1()
    {
        var t = new TfsWrapper();
        var isValid = t.ValidateConfigPath("$/Quantz/Main/CSS Calculator/main.py");
        Assert.IsFalse(isValid);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void ValidateConfigPath_InCorrect2()
    {
        var t = new TfsWrapper();
        var isValid = t.ValidateConfigPath("C:/Quantz/Main/CSS Calculator/main.xml");
        Assert.IsFalse(isValid);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void ValidateConfigPath_Correct()
    {
        var t = new TfsWrapper();
        var isValid = t.ValidateConfigPath("$/Quantz/Main/CSS Calculator/main.xml");
        Assert.IsTrue(isValid);
    }
share|improve this question
    
Why do you feel you need a regular expression for this? Do you have the option of just checking that the first character is a '$' and the last four are ".xml"? That would be a much simpler solution. –  Bryan Oakley Nov 18 '12 at 17:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there's not a strict requirement for using regular expressions, I recommend the more straight-forward approach of simply checking the starting and ending characters:

string.startswith("$") and string.endswith("xml")

With the above, the intent is absolutely clear to anyone, including people who don't understand regular expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
Smart! That's a nice one too. –  Tarun Arora Nov 18 '12 at 18:00

Have you read a tutorial?

^\$.*xml$

^ is the beginning of the string. \$ is a literal $ character. .* is 0 or more arbitrary characters (in fact, no line breaks, but that does not seem to matter in your input example). xml is really just xml. And $ is the end of the string.

share|improve this answer

Try this:-

  ^\$.*xml$

Check this link for details

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.