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In advance, I have searched for a solution to this problem already but there does not seem to be one in existence. So I am currently trying to self teach python by running through the Python "Path" on http://singpath.appspot.com and I ran into a problem I do not understand how to solve. I have tried multiple different ways to solve it but keep coming up with different incorrect results. Any hints/help would be spectacular! Thanks in advance!

Question:

Comparing Strings

Create a function that takes an input of two strings and returns a string that contains all of the characters that appear in both of the inputs. The result should not have any repeats and should be listed in sorted order. You might want to use the variable lowercase from the string module so that you have all the letters in order.

My Current Code:

def in_both(s1, s2):
    s1 = s1.lower()
    s2 = s2.lower()

    l1=list(''.join(s1.split()))
    l2=list(''.join(s2.split()))

    same = ''

    for i in l1:
        if i in l2:

            same = ''.join(i)

    return same

Example:

call: in_both('apple','orange') recieved: 'e' expected: 'ae'

As you can see it is only collecting a single similar character. Any suggestions? I've tried a couple of different things but I am unsure where to go from here! Please help!

P.s. I got the list idea from a similar question located here: Python Function to return a list of common letters in first and last names

I understand how it works the problem is I have to return a string with all comparisons at the same time. Thanks 'the wolf' for the idea for the list(s) of characters.

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Not sure what you're going for with ''.join(s2.split()). Removing spaces doesn't seem to be in the question –  Eric Nov 18 '12 at 17:56
1  
And you have to use something like that? You can't just do ''.join(sorted(set(string1).intersection(string2))) ? (minus any casing issues) –  Jon Clements Nov 18 '12 at 17:57
    
@JonClements As I stated "I got the list idea from a similar question located here: Python Function to return a list of common letters in first and last names" I'm still new to programming but I understood that code to know it worked to make the list to work. Thanks for pointing out this new and more simplistic method of doing things it. The more I learn the better! –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 18:05
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can get unique characters in any string by turning it into a set. The you can get the intersection of two sets using intersection. And you can sort the result, which returns a list.

def in_both(s1, s2):
    s1 = s1.lower()
    s2 = s2.lower()
    s1_chars = set(s1)
    s2_chars = set(s2)
    result = sorted(s1_chars.intersection(s2_chars))
    return result
share|improve this answer
    
That code is way cleaner than mine :P I guess I better look into set() sooner than later. Thanks for your solution! P.s. The one problem is it's supposed to return a string but that can easily be overcome with ''.join(string) right? –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 18:17
    
You are right :) –  Steve K Nov 18 '12 at 18:18
1  
Note that set.intersection takes an iterable so it's not necessary for s2_chars to be a set. –  Jon Clements Nov 18 '12 at 18:21
    
@Steve K Great XD Thanks for introducing me to set()! –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 18:21
    
@Jon Clements I really do need to learn set() :) Thanks for the input! –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 18:22
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You don't append to the variable "send" on each loop, you set it from scratch. I suppose you want to change the line

same = ''.join(i)

to:

same += i
share|improve this answer
    
Ahhhh I'm a dunce! Your right I must have forgotten the plus. However when I run it with the '+=' it will add the same similar characters to the variable :P Nothing a quick if statement can't fix :) Thanks for pointing out my obvious (and embarassing) syntax error! –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 17:57
1  
@Winkleson: You realize ''.join(i), where i is a string, is the same as i? –  Eric Nov 18 '12 at 17:58
1  
@Eric Of course your right. I just took his code and did'nt thought much about that part about it. –  Niclas Nilsson Nov 18 '12 at 17:59
    
@Eric yeah I was playing around with the code alot that probably had to do with some type transfers from earlier and trying to solve some type errors with no positive result :P –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 18:00
1  
@Winkleson Instead of append to a string, append to a list (it seems more natural in the first place). Then you can sort with "sorted(same)" and return it as a string with "''.join(same) –  Niclas Nilsson Nov 18 '12 at 18:04
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You can convert into set of char first and then find intersection

str1 = 'apple'
str2 = 'orange'
print list(str1)

set1 = set(list(str1))
set2 = set(list(str2))
setout = set1 & set2

print setout
myres = ''.join(setout)
print myres

Output of above code

kkiller-machine:Eclipse$ python unique.letter.py

['a', 'p', 'p', 'l', 'e']
set(['a', 'e'])
ae
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for bringing up another way to solve it :P I have no practice with set() but I'm sure I'll learn to use it in the future! –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 18:15
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First of all thanks everyone who helped me solve the question! The final solution I inputted is below. It may not be very pythonic but it get's the job done :) If I have any time later I'll come back and revisit the solution! Anyways thanks for your suggestions!

Code:


def in_both(s1, s2):
    s1 = s1.lower()
    s2 = s2.lower()

    l1=list(''.join(s1.split()))
    l2=list(''.join(s2.split()))

    same = []

    for i in l1:
        if i in l2:            
            if i not in same:
                same += i
                same = sorted(same)
                same = ''.join(same)

    return same
share|improve this answer
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try this :

def in_both(s1,s2):
       l1 =[]
       l2 = []
       l1= list(s1.lower())
       l2= list(s2.lower())
       s = [i for i in l1 if i in l2]
       same = list(set(''.join(s)))
       return same
share|improve this answer
    
This would not have worked as it would have copies of the same similar characters (Say there are multiple same characters in both like 'poppy' and 'pineapple'. That's why I used multiple if's and one for loop in a non-Pythonic way of coding :P Thanks for your input though! –  Winkleson Nov 18 '12 at 18:20
1  
sorry Winkleson , was my mistake didn't read your question correct , you are right .i made some modulation for the one who is interesting in this code . thanks , and once again sorry for the inconvenient code . –  mazlor Nov 18 '12 at 20:19
    
No problem sir :) Any help is greatly appreciated and It's hard to deduct information from my run on sentences XD Thanks for your help! –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 18:46
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