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I have a Person class. Inside this Person class, I have a pointer Strategy object, which is my base class (I'm using inheritance/polymorphism):

Strategy* strat;

I also have a Parser class. And I say these two lines of code in my parser class:

StrategyType* newStrat; = new StrategyType;
person.strat = newStrat

StrategyType is part of the hierarchy of my base class, Strategy. And now, I want to delete strat at the end of my program, so I don't cause a memory leak. I created a Person destructor that basically deletes strat. But the problem is, my Person destructor gets called inside my Parser class, where the Person object falls out of scope. I want my Person object to live longer than that. I could also dynamically allocate the Person object to solve this problem. But then the new question would be, how would I delete the dynamically allocated Person objects?

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2  
Hard to tell without more details, but it sounds like what you probably want is a shared_ptr. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 18 '12 at 18:16
    
But then the new question would be, how would I delete the dynamically allocated Person objects? The question is not clear, as what you describe is not necessarily limited to a single possibile implementation, however, my tip is: delete the Person object in the Parser destructor! Remember also to have destructors virtual when appropriate. –  Vincenzo Pii Nov 18 '12 at 18:17
    
You could keep a vector of pointers to all the person objects you've allocated, and then keep that around until they need to be deleted. –  Vaughn Cato Nov 18 '12 at 18:17
    
Where is the Person created? Is a member of your Parser class? Is it a local variable inside a member function? –  Vaughn Cato Nov 18 '12 at 18:20
    
If you want the Person to outlive the Parser, don't have the Parser own the Person. –  molbdnilo Nov 18 '12 at 19:13

2 Answers 2

From my understanding, you have a situation where your Parser class has a Person object, but you want the Person object to be able to outlive the Parser object. This is what std::shared_ptr is for.

class Parser
{
public:
    Parser(std::shared_ptr<Person> person)
        :m_person(std::move(person))
    {
        // probably want to use a unique_ptr for strat, but one thing at a time
        m_person->strat = new StrategyType;
    }
private:
    std::shared_ptr<Person> m_person;
};

int main()
{
    auto person = std::make_shared<Person>();

    {
        Parser parser(person);
        // parser shares person            
    }
    // parser is destroyed, but person lives on

    person->do_something();
}
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I think you need a combination of shared_ptr and unique_ptr. Strategy type should be in one of your base classes, and you should use shared/unique ptr based on need, it's unique_ptr here for now. That way you are certain re-assignment will not leak or better check if it is already assigned.

Obviously you don't want member-vars to be public, but here they are for demonstration.

#include <memory>

class StrategyType
{};

class PersonBase
{
public:
    std::unique_ptr<StrategyType> strat;
};

class Person : public PersonBase
{
public:

    void do_something()
    {
        double d = 0;
        d = d + 9;
        d = d * d;
    }
};

class Parser
{
public:
    //  makes no sense in moving shared_ptr
    //  hence pass by value
    Parser(std::shared_ptr<Person> _person)
        :m_person(_person)
    {
        // probably want to use a unique_ptr for strat, but one thing at a time
        m_person->strat.reset(new StrategyType);
    }
private:
    std::shared_ptr<Person> m_person;
};

int main()
{
    auto person = std::make_shared<Person>();

    {
        Parser parser(person);
        // parser shares person            
    }
    // parser is destroyed, but person lives on

    person->do_something();
}
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Why do you say it makes no sense to move a shared_ptr? Why needlessly invoke the ref-counting mechanism? –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 18 '12 at 19:11
    
@Benjamin: try it out, and check for use_count. You will find while moving cctor for shared_ptr was called and ref count was incremented. If shared_ptr was moved then call to do_something would have been undefined-behaviour Same behaviour with VS2012 & GCC4.8. –  Sarang Nov 18 '12 at 19:24
    
Obviously, the copy constructor for shared_ptr is called when the shared_ptr is copied into the parameter of Parser's constructor. This unneeded copy is then moved into the member object. The ref count was only incremented to 2, as it should be. There is no undefined behavior. With your code, you copy into the parameter, incrementing the ref count to 2. Then copy again into the member, bringing the ref count to 3. Then when Parser's constructor exits, the parameter is destroyed and the ref count is decremented back down to 2. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 18 '12 at 19:35

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