Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm posting a new thread since the last one was very confused and the idea has been modified as well. I changed the program in many places, not losing efficiency (even gaining a bit) and now I have a simple array of integers as before, no separators needed.

Previous thread for the reference

I do know that this kind of questions have already been answered many times. Although I've found lots of possible answers, they still don't solve my problem, which is to implement the fastest possible way to convert an integer array into a single string.

All right then,

int[] Result = new int[] { 636, 1000234545, 1353678530, 987001 }

I should get:

636000234545353678530987001

Notice that I have taken only the last 9 digits of each element. Here's corrected version of Honza Brestan:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

for (var i = 0; i < xC; i++)
{
    tempint = Result[i];
    if (tempint > 999999999)
        sb.Append((Result[i]).ToString().Substring(1, 9));
    else
        sb.Append((Result[i]).ToString());
}
return sb.ToString();

And my, old, corrected:

//Base – a string array of integers saved as strings {“000”, “001”, … , “999” }
string[] arr = new string[3 * limit];
int x; // temp value

for (int i = 0; i < limit; i++)
{
    x = Result[i];

    if (x > 999999)
    {
        arr [3 * i + 2] = Base [x % 1000];
        arr [3 * i + 1] = Base [x / 1000 % 1000];
        arr [3 * i] = Base [x / 1000000 % 1000];
    }
    else
    {
        if (x < 1000)
        {
            arr [3 * i + 2] = Base [x % 1000];
        }
        else
        {
            arr [3 * i] = Base [x / 1000 % 1000];
            arr [3 * i + 1] = Base [x % 1000];
        }
    }
}
return string.Join(null, arr);

And now difference in speed: Honza: 689 ms My: 331 ms

Any ideas how to improve the speed? Maybe use assembler?

share|improve this question
6  
How confident are you that this is really a bottleneck in your system? –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '12 at 18:12
    
A bottleneck? I don't get what you mean... Sorry, I'm not a native English speaker. Could you please say it in other words? –  Randolph Nov 18 '12 at 18:14
1  
3  
@Randolph: Bottleneck = the thing which is costing you most in performance. In the grand scheme of things (not just in one operation) how much is this what's causing poor performance in your application? How fast do you need it to be? (If you don't have any performance goals, how will you know when you're done?) –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '12 at 18:16
    
@Jon Skeet - thanks for the explanation. I'm writing a program for a contest. It is supposed to calculate billions of cases, the part I need to optimize is a small part of a function that adds huge integers saved as strings. Adding is necessary for the Karatsuba algorithm of multiplication. –  Randolph Nov 18 '12 at 18:24

2 Answers 2

what about Parallelism, maybe it helps you?

    int[] list = new int[100];
    Random rand = new Random();
    for(int k = 0; k < list.Length; k++)
    {
        list[k] = rand.Next(0, 200000);
    }
    object monitor = new object();
    var stopwatch = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew();

    char[] result = new char[list.Length * list.Max().ToString().Length];//worst case scenario.
    for (int j = 0; j < 120000; j++)
    {
        //partitioning.
        Parallel.ForEach(Partitioner.Create(0, list.Length), () => 0.0, (range, state, local) =>
        {
            StringBuilder xc = new StringBuilder();
            for (int i = range.Item1; i < range.Item2; i++)
            {
                //split the number into characters.
                int number = list[i];
                int index = i;
                do
                {
                    int lsd = number % 10;       // Get least significant // digit
                    result[index++] = (char)(lsd + 47);
                    number /= 10;                        // Prepare for next most  // significant digit
                } while(number != 0);
            }
            return 0.0;
        }, local => {});
    }
    stopwatch.Stop(); MessageBox.Show(stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());

for optimization you want to try unsafe code which will yield better performance. C# does some security checks and it makes things slower. Such as array index checking.

Allocate buffers always with the correct size and try to avoid string.Join.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure it works? –  Randolph Nov 18 '12 at 20:31

OK, I believe I resolved my problem ;) Just for the others that would like to use what I've done. Just before I was benchmarking two functions, nearly the same, differing only with the last part, converting integer arrays to single strings.

//Function one:
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
if (iscarry) sb.Append("1");
xC++;
for (iX = 0; iX < xC; iX++)
{
    tempint = Result[iX];

    if (tempint > 99999)
    {
        sb.Append(SmallBase[tempint / 100000 % 10000]);
        sb.Append(BigBase[tempint % 100000]);
    }
    else
    {
        sb.Append(BigBase[tempint % 100000].TrimStart('0'));
    }
}

return sb.ToString();

//Function two:
xC++;
AnswerArr = new string[2 * xC];
for (iX = 0; iX < xC; iX++)
{
    tempint = Result[iX];

    if (tempint > 99999)
    {
        AnswerArr[2 * iX] = SmallBase[tempint / 100000 % 10000];
        AnswerArr[2 * iX + 1] = BigBase[tempint % 100000];
    }
    else
    {
        AnswerArr[2 * iX] = BigBase[tempint % 100000].TrimStart('0');
    }
}

return string.Join(null, AnswerArr).TrimStart('0');

Both codes give me the same results. This is about 271 ms for the previous input.

I was thinking that for very many elements of the integer array, StringBuilder will be a bit faster. So I wrote two loops, functions were supposed to perform adding of integers saved as strings, together having from 2 digits, up to 320.000. Here's the result:

with StringBuilder: 5754 ms.
with array & string.Join: 5788 ms.

It doesn't mean anything, this is a negligible difference. So I made it one more time, up to 1.280.000 digits together.

with StringBuilder: 5242 ms.
with array & string.Join: 5248 ms.

I can say, it's up to you which way to choose. String Builder is easier to understand and takes less space. The second way with arrays is more fancy :D

I think that's all... Hope this helps. Thanks for listening. Peace!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.