Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a .Net C# application where I'm attempting to spawn multiple threads. The application is for performance testing and is a simple console app. The piece for spawning threads works fine.

What I'm looking for is the correct mechanism fo either being notified when all the threads complete execution, or waiting within my application for all the threads to complete. At the point I will print out the summary of the results.

Here is what my code snippet looks like:

String testName = "foo";
String fullTestName;

// Iterate and create threads
for (int index = 0; index < numberOfThreads; index++)
{
    fullTestName = String.Format("{0}Thread{1}", testName, index);

    Thread thread = new Thread(() => PerformanceTest(fullTestName, index, numberOfRows, testToRun));

    thread.IsBackground = true;
    thread.Name = fullTestName;
    thread.Start();
}

void PerformanceTest(String testName, int iterationNumber, long numberOfRows)
{
    // Insert a bunch of rows into DB
}

I've looked at using RegisterWaitForSingleObject(), but could not figure out how to use it with my scenario.

share|improve this question
    
Possible solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/358721/… –  Valentin Vasilyev Nov 20 '12 at 11:34

4 Answers 4

You can use Task instead of Thread. It gives you higher level of abstraction over parallel operations and with that a nice library of synchronization methods. For example you can use the following to wait for all Tasks to finish.

IEnumerable<Task> BeginParallelTests(string fullTestName, int numberOfThreads)
{
    for(var index = 0; index < numberOfThreads; index++)
    {
        yield return Task.Factory.StartNew(
            () => PerformanceTest(fullTestName, index, numberOfRows));
    }
}

And then in your main method you can use just:

Task.WaitAll(BeginParallelTests(testName, numberOfThreads));

(Maybe you'll have to use something like ToArray() to force the enumeration of the the BeginParallelTest method)

share|improve this answer
    
As per my comment to asawyer: while I would usually suggest using a higher level abstraction, if the OP wants careful control over the number of actual threads executing concurrently, TPL isn't a good fit, precisely because it hides a lot of this. –  Jon Skeet Nov 19 '12 at 6:41
    
You should include LongRunning in the execution options, given the nature of the tasks that are being run. –  casperOne Nov 19 '12 at 17:07

Try using Tasks instead of threads.

class Program
{

    static Random random = new Random();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        TaskFactory taskfactory = new TaskFactory(TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning, TaskContinuationOptions.None);
        var tasks = new List<Task>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            var task = taskfactory.StartNew(() => { DoWork("Thread " + i); });
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Started thread {0}", i));
            tasks.Add(task);
        }
        Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());  
    }

    static void DoWork(string threadname)
    {
        int sleeptime = random.Next(10) * 1000;
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Thread {0} sleeping {1}ms", threadname, sleeptime));
        Thread.Sleep(sleeptime);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

What I'm looking for is the correct mechanism fo either being notified when all the threads complete execution, or waiting within my application for all the threads to complete.

The simplest approach is just to keep track of the threads (use an array) and then call Thread.Join on each thread in turn:

Thread[] threads = new Thread[numberOfThreads];
for (int index = 0; index < numberOfThreads; index++)
{
    string fullTestName = String.Format("{0}Thread{1}", testName, index);

    Thread thread = new Thread
         (() => PerformanceTest(fullTestName, index, numberOfRows, testToRun));    
    thread.IsBackground = true;
    thread.Name = fullTestName;
    thread.Start();
    threads[index] = thread;
}

// Wait for everything to finish
foreach (Thread thread in threads)
{
    thread.Join();
}

Using the Task Parallel Library would be another alternative, but then you may well not have many threads running at a time - it may well perform better that way, but if you're trying to measure what happens with a specific number of threads, you need to really start them all yourself.

share|improve this answer

Another suggestion would be to step up a level of abstraction with either PLinq or the new asynch keywords.

Here is a PLinq example that abstracts threading away from the developer to the framework.

string testName = "foo";
string fullTestName;

var testIterations = 100;
Enumerable.Range(0, testIterations).AsParallel().ForAll(i=>
{
    PerformanceTest(testName,i,numberOfRows);
});


void PerformanceTest(String testName, int iterationNumber, long numberOfRows)
{
    // Insert a bunch of rows into DB
}
share|improve this answer
    
It depends what the OP's aim is - if it's to see what degree of parallelization is useful, then the fact that this abstracts the threading away may be actively unhelpful. (Not my downvote, mind you...) –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '12 at 18:42
    
@JonSkeet I understand, just wanted to offer a suggestion to the OP. –  asawyer Nov 18 '12 at 18:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.