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class foo{

public:
    int a, b, c;
    double val;

    foo(int a){
        ...
    }

...
}

Now I want to do:

map <foo*, double> mymap;

foo fa(2);
foo fb(4);

mymap[fa] = 1.0;
mymap[fb] = 2.0;

Obviously I get the error that [ ] is undefined for type foo. But how do I overload this operator? And for that matter, how do I get a pointer to foo? Because I'm assuming it's not defined since foo is a custom class

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"How do I get a pointer" should be part of your C++ textbook or course material. "Why do I want a pointer" is an entirely different question :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 18 '12 at 18:44

3 Answers 3

Keeping and using pointer to some local objects inside a map may be extemely dangerous. First of all you may crash your app by dereferencing std::map key when the objects go out of scope. Moreover it is really hard to use and in most cases not what programmer inteded. In your case:

auto it = mymap.find(&foo(2))

will not compile and:

foo fc(2);
auto it = mymap.find(&fc);

will not find any value inside the container (fa have the same value but different pointer). Is it really what you wanted?

It is why I would recommend redefining your std::map to std::map<foo, double> mymap; which will keep and compare foo by value. To make it work you will need to either implement foo::operator<() or provide your own soring algorithm to std::map as template argument. First case will look like that:

class foo {
  int a, b, c;
  double val;
public:
  foo(int a) {}
  bool operator<(const foo &other) const
  { return a < other.a && b < other.b && c < other.c; }
};


int main()
{
  std::map<foo, double> mymap;

  foo fa(2);
  foo fb(4);

  mymap[fa] = 1.0;
  mymap[fb] = 2.0;

  auto it = mymap.find(foo(2));
}
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There is no need to oveload anything here. Your map expects pointers to foo, so you need to pass pointers to foo. You can fix your code like this:

mymap[&fa] = 1.0;
mymap[&fb] = 2.0;

Beware you have to be absolutely sure that the foo objects will live as long as or longer than the map, otherwise the latter would end up with dangling pointers. This, for example, would end in tears:

map <foo*, double> mymap;

{
  foo fa(2);
  foo fb(4);
  mymap[&fa] = 1.0;
  mymap[&fb] = 2.0;
} // fa and fb cease to exist

// state of mymap is messed up here.
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2  
Yet, inserting pointers to local objects through the reference operator is usually a very bad idea. Btw, I know the map is on the same scope of the objects so it shouldn't be a problem but if the usage changes it really needs to be considered –  emartel Nov 18 '12 at 18:43
    
@emartel The map and the foos are in the same scope so it is reasonably safe. –  juanchopanza Nov 18 '12 at 18:45
2  
yes that's why I edited my comment to point out I was aware of this, but if the OP didn't realize, it's important for him to know –  emartel Nov 18 '12 at 18:46
    
@emartel You're right. I added a clear warning. –  juanchopanza Nov 18 '12 at 18:53

The key has to be of type foo*. So you need to write this:

mymap[&fa] = 1.0;
mymap[&fb] = 2.0;

But remember that if fa and fb are local objects, then they will be destroyed when you return from the function. So you should not return mymap from the function, as the objects used as keys don't exist once the function returns.

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