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I'm developing a Java app with NetBeans 7.2 and JDK 7. It's set to use the system look and feel. It runs fine on Windows, but when I double click the jar on a Mac OS X Snow Leopard I get:

The Java JAR File could not be launched, check console for possible error messages.

Apparently Snow Leopard is using JRE 6 and can't be updated. I thought Java is all about "Write once run anywhere", but that doesn't seem to be the case.

What wrong here and can I somehow make my app run on this mac?

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I thought Java is all about "Write once run anywhere", but that doesn't seem to be the case. ... it is the case, but not if you downgrade your JDK. Either compile it with JDK 6 or manually download JDK7 on your Mac –  Robin Nov 18 '12 at 21:17
    
@Robin So does that mean the JDK 6 is compatible with JRE 6 and so on? Is that the way JDK and JRE are related? If I do this it will be compatible with Snow Leopard, right, but it might not be with older versions of Mac. How Can I make sure my app will run on every version of WIndows and Macs? I'm also using some statements like "multi-catch" that are not supported in JDK 6. –  Igor Nov 18 '12 at 21:21
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How Can I make sure my app will run on every version of WIndows and Macs That is not possible. Typically you have a requirement for an application that it at least require Java version x, and then you compile it with version x. For example when you develop/compile with JDK7 you might be using api which is not available on JDK6, so you cannot expect that to work –  Robin Nov 18 '12 at 21:22
    
Are you setting a L&F that's not available on Mac OS X? –  trashgod Nov 18 '12 at 22:30
    
@trashgod it's set to use the system L&F, so it is very available. –  Igor Nov 18 '12 at 22:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

At a guess, you've compiled the classes with Java 7, and you're trying to run them using a Java 6 runtime. Check the console output to see: java -jar your.jar.

In NetBeans Tools > Java Platforms, verify that JDK 1.6 is available. In File > Project Properties > Sources > Source/Binary Format, choose JDK 1.6. In File > Project Properties > Libraries > Java Platform, choose JDK 1.6.

Addendum: You still haven't explained the connection between the source and the platform version.

Netbeans uses these settings to manipulate the -source and -target options of the Java compiler, javac, which explains more. From the command line, -bootclasspath can be used to ensure that no library classes of a later version are inadvertently used in targeting an earlier version. This Source and Target Options table outlines the history of some significant features.

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I set JDK 6 as the source format, but JDK 1.6 is not available in Libraries. You just told me what to do without any explanation. Me and others that would like to learn how things really work, would appretiate if you could explain how these thing relate to each other, thus explaining what causes the problem, instead of just solving it. –  Igor Nov 19 '12 at 11:57
    
Did changing the source format help? What does the console show. If JDK 1.6 is on your machine, you can add it from the Java Platform dialog. From the command line, use the -source and target options. –  trashgod Nov 19 '12 at 20:48
    
Yes it did, but you still haven't explained the connection between the source and the platform version. –  Igor Nov 20 '12 at 8:54
    
I've elaborated above. –  trashgod Nov 20 '12 at 15:12

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