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I'd like to know how many return arguments method_missing is being called for in Ruby. I would like to change the functions behaviour depending on how many return arguments it is supposed to produce. I'm looking for something equivalent to nargout in Matlab. XXX in this example:

class Test
  def method_missing(method_id, *args)
    n_return_arguments = XXX
    if n_return_arguments == 1
      return 5
    else
      return 10, 20
    end
  end
end

t = Test.new.missing_method # t should now be 5

t1, t2 = Test.new.missing_method # t1 should now be 10 and t2 should now be 20
share|improve this question
    
n_output_arguments = args.size was the code I wrote in an early revision of my answer. It is the code "you might wish I wrote". It does rely on arguments to get hints on its expected behavior. – vgoff Nov 18 '12 at 22:29
    
I deleted my reply earlier because I was not sure what you were looking for. But after seeing your discussion below it seems it is what I thought it was, so here's the original reply: What you want to do is not possible with Ruby. There is no way for a Ruby method to know how or where the return value from the method call is being used. Hence there is no way for you to accomplish what you would like to do. You have no other choice but to solve this problem some other way. – Casper Nov 18 '12 at 22:56
    
Thanks Casper! If you post a short answer and I'll be happy to accept it. – morri Nov 18 '12 at 23:03
    
Is there a real use case for this? I've never felt a need for anything remotely like it. – Catnapper Nov 19 '12 at 1:29

As the args variable will be an Array if there are multiple arguments. We can simply check the return directly. If it is an array, it will respond to size, and if it is not, it may not. We can use class or inspect it to get the information we need.

class Test
  def method_missing(method_id, *args)
    n_return_arguments = XXX
    if n_return_arguments == 1
      return 5
    else
      return 10, 20
    end
  end
end

XXX = "anything but 1"
t = Test.new.this_nonexistent_method # => 5
puts "t = #{t.inspect}"

XXX = 1
t1, t2 = Test.new.this_nonexistent_method.size # => 2
puts "t1 = #{t1.inspect}, t2 = #{t2.inspect}"

Using XXX value to change the behavior of your method.

The return will always be one value, sometimes an Array holding more than 1 element.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I'm looking for the number of return not input arguments. I edited the question to say return instead of output. – morri Nov 18 '12 at 21:36
    
Ah, that part is simple. There can always only be (and it will always return) one return from a method in Ruby. It may be an Array that is returned, or a Hash, of which you can get the size of, but it will always only be and always be exactly one return, never multiples. To clarify based on your parallel assignment, when that happens you are taking the elements of an array and assigning them to each variable. – vgoff Nov 18 '12 at 21:43
    
Nonetheless, I would like to know whether the return array is going to be unpacked into one variable on the other side or more than one. It seems that this information is impossible to find out. – morri Nov 18 '12 at 21:48
    
Edited answer to address this expected question. And in direct answer to your comment above, there is my comment above that. – vgoff Nov 18 '12 at 21:51
    
Just to be clear. I don't care at all about the number of input arguments. I edited the code in my question to try and clarify what I'm looking for. – morri Nov 18 '12 at 21:57

There's no such thing as multiple return values in Ruby. Methods always return exactly one value. Never more. Never less.

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