Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I got the error mcar: contract violationexpected: mpair? given: () while running these code:

(define helpy 
  (lambda (y listz)
    (map (lambda (z) (list y z))
         listz)))

(define print
  (lambda (listy)
    (cond
      ((null? list) (newline))
      (#t (helpy (car listy) (cdr listy))
          (print (cdr listy))))))

My code is trying to return pairs in a list. For example, when I call (print '(a b c)) it should return ((a b) (a c) (b c)).

I just fix and update my code, now it don't return error but I can only get pair ( (a b) (a c), when running these code:

(define helpy

(lambda (y listz)

(map (lambda (z) (list y z))

listz)))

(define print

(lambda (listy)

(cond

((null? listy) (newline))

(#t (helpy (car listy) (cdr listy)))

(print (cdr listy)))))

I think that I got something wrong with the recursion

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are a couple of problems with the code. First, by convention the "else" clause of a cond should start with an else, not a #t. Second, the null? test in print should receive listy, not list. And third, you're not doing anything with the result returned by helpy in print, you're just advancing print over the cdr of the current list without doing anything with the value returned by the recursive call. Try this instead:

(define print
  (lambda (listy)
    (cond
      ((null? listy) (newline))
      (else
       (displayln (helpy (car listy) (cdr listy)))
       (print (cdr listy))))))

displayln is just an example, do something else with the returned result if necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
"The last clause of a cond should start with an else, not a #t". Really? I'm don't write much scheme, but I thought that was a stylistic thing that doesn't have universal agreement. –  amalloy Nov 18 '12 at 22:02
    
@amalloy #t works, but it's not the usual way to write it - that's more of a Common Lisp convention than Scheme's –  Óscar López Nov 18 '12 at 22:05
    
@ÓscarLópez: Thanks you The racket can't define the term displayln in your code, anw I update my code, it now doesn't return error, but I only can get pair (a b)(a c) insted of (a b)(a c)(b c), I think it has something wrong with recursion??? –  Daniel Nov 18 '12 at 22:15
    
@Daniel try with display then. The code above was tested in Racket using the language @lang racket and it prints the results –  Óscar López Nov 18 '12 at 22:16
    
@ÓscarLópez: it worked, thanks you so much for your help –  Daniel Nov 18 '12 at 22:20

I try to implement like this:

#lang racket

(define data '(a b c d))

(define (one-list head line-list)
  (if (null? line-list)
      null
      (cons
       (cons head (car line-list))
       (one-list head (rest line-list)))))

(letrec ([deal-data
           (lambda (data)
             (if (null? data)
                 '()
                 (append
                  (one-list (car data) (rest data))
                  (deal-data (rest data)))))])

  (deal-data data))

run result:

'((a . b) (a . c) (a . d) (b . c) (b . d) (c . d))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.