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I have a sorted JavaScript array, and want to insert one more item into the array such the resulting array remains sorted. I could certainly implement a simple quicksort-style insertion function:

var array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];
var element = 3.5;
function insert(element, array) {
  array.splice(locationOf(element, array) + 1, 0, element);
  return array;
}

function locationOf(element, array, start, end) {
  start = start || 0;
  end = end || array.length;
  var pivot = parseInt(start + (end - start) / 2, 10);
  if (end-start <= 1 || array[pivot] === element) return pivot;
  if (array[pivot] < element) {
    return locationOf(element, array, pivot, end);
  } else {
    return locationOf(element, array, start, pivot);
  }
}

console.log(insert(element, array));

However, I noticed that implementations of the Array.sort function might potentially do this for me, and natively:

var array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];
var element = 3.5;
function insert(element, array) {
  array.push(element);
  array.sort(function(a, b) {
    return a - b;
  });
  return array;
}

console.log(insert(element, array));

Is there a good reason to choose the first implementation over the second?

Edit: Note that for the general case, an O(log(n)) insertion (as implemented in the first example) will be faster than a generic sorting algorithm; however this is not necessarily the case for JavaScript in particular. Note that:

  • Best case for several insertion algorithms is O(n), which is still significantly different from O(log(n)), but not quite as bad as O(n log(n)) as mentioned below. It would come down to the particular sorting algorithm used (see Javascript Array.sort implementation?)
  • The sort method in JavaScript is a native function, so potentially realizing huge benefits -- O(log(n)) with a huge coefficient can still be much worse than O(n) for reasonably sized data sets.
share|improve this question
    
using splice in the second implementation is a bit wasteful. Why not use push? –  Breton Aug 28 '09 at 1:30
    
Good point, I just copied it from the first. –  Elliot Kroo Aug 28 '09 at 4:14
2  
Anything containing splice() (e.g. your 1st example) is already O(n). Even if it doesn't internally create a new copy of the entire array, it potentially has to shunt all n items back 1 position if the element is to be inserted in position 0. Maybe it's fast because it's a native function and the constant is low, but it's O(n) nonetheless. –  j_random_hacker Jan 2 '11 at 8:19
    
what does start||0 suppose to do? –  Pinocchio Apr 6 '14 at 0:30
    
also, for future reference for people using this code, the code has a bug when trying to insert to the beginning of the array. Look further down for the corrected code. –  Pinocchio Apr 6 '14 at 0:36

8 Answers 8

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Just as a single data point, for kicks I tested this out inserting 1000 random elements into an array of 100,000 pre-sorted numbers using the two methods using Chrome on Windows 7:

First Method:
~54 milliseconds
Second Method:
~57 seconds

So, at least on this setup, the native method doesn't make up for it. This is true even for small data sets, inserting 100 elements into an array of 1000:

First Method:
1 milliseconds
Second Method:
34 milliseconds
share|improve this answer
1  
arrays.sort sounds quite terrible –  njzk2 Oct 11 '12 at 7:41

There's a bug in your code. It should read:

function locationOf(element, array, start, end) {
  start = start || 0;
  end = end || array.length;
  var pivot = parseInt(start + (end - start) / 2, 10);
  if (array[pivot] === element) return pivot;
  if (end - start <= 1)
    return array[pivot] > element ? pivot - 1 : pivot;
  if (array[pivot] < element) {
    return locationOf(element, array, pivot, end);
  } else {
    return locationOf(element, array, start, pivot);
  }
}

Without this fix the code will never be able to insert an element at the beginning of the array.

share|improve this answer
    
why are you or-ing a int with 0? i.e. what does start || 0 do? –  Pinocchio Apr 6 '14 at 0:38
    
@Pinocchio: start || 0 is a short equivalent of: if(!start) start = 0; - However, the "longer" version is more efficent, because it does not assign a variable to itself. –  SuperNova Apr 9 '14 at 13:36

Your insertion function assumes that the given array is sorted, it searches directly for the location where the new element can be inserted, usually by just looking at a few of the elements in the array.

The general sort function of an array can't take these shortcuts. Obviously it at least has to inspect all elements in the array to see if they are already correctly ordered. This fact alone makes the general sort slower than the insertion function.

A generic sort algorithm is usually on average O(n*log(n()) and depending on the implementation it might actually be the worst case if the array is already sorted, leading to complexities of O(n^2). Directly searching for the insertion position instead has just a complexity of O(log(n)), so it will always be much faster.

share|improve this answer

Very good and remarkable question with a very interesting discussion! I also was using the Array.sort() function after pushing a single element in an array with some thousands of objects.

I had to extend your locationOf function for my purpose because of having complex objects and therefore the need for a compare function like in Array.sort():

function locationOf(element, array, comparer, start, end) {
    if (array.length === 0)
        return -1;

    start = start || 0;
    end = end || array.length;
    var pivot = (start + end) >> 1;  // should be faster than the above calculation

    var c = comparer(element, array[pivot]);
    if (end - start <= 1) return c == -1 ? pivot - 1 : pivot;

    switch (c) {
        case -1: return locationOf(element, array, comparer, start, pivot);
        case 0: return pivot;
        case 1: return locationOf(element, array, comparer, pivot, end);
    };
};

// sample for objects like {lastName: 'Miller', ...}
var patientCompare = function (a, b) {
    if (a.lastName < b.lastName) return -1;
    if (a.lastName > b.lastName) return 1;
    return 0;
};
share|improve this answer
    
It seems worth noting, for the record, that this version DOES work correctly when trying to insert to the beginning of the array. (It's worth mentioning it because the version in the original question has a bug and doesn't work correctly for that case.) –  garyrob May 1 '14 at 14:58

Here are a few thoughts: Firstly, if you're genuinely concerned about the runtime of your code, be sure to know what happens when you call the built-in functions! I don't know up from down in javascript, but a quick google of the splice function returned this, which seems to indicate that you're creating a whole new array each call! I don't know if it actually matters, but it is certainly related to efficiency. I see that Breton, in the comments, has already pointed this out, but it certainly holds for whatever array-manipulating function you choose.

Anyways, onto actually solving the problem.

When I read that you wanted to sort, my first thought is to use insertion sort!. It is handy because it runs in linear time on sorted, or nearly-sorted lists. As your arrays will have only 1 element out of order, that counts as nearly-sorted (except for, well, arrays of size 2 or 3 or whatever, but at that point, c'mon). Now, implementing the sort isn't too too bad, but it is a hassle you may not want to deal with, and again, I don't know a thing about javascript and if it will be easy or hard or whatnot. This removes the need for your lookup function, and you just push (as Breton suggested).

Secondly, your "quicksort-esque" lookup function seems to be a binary search algorithm! It is a very nice algorithm, intuitive and fast, but with one catch: it is notoriously difficult to implement correctly. I won't dare say if yours is correct or not (I hope it is, of course! :)), but be wary if you want to use it.

Anyways, summary: using "push" with insertion sort will work in linear time (assuming the rest of the array is sorted), and avoid any messy binary search algorithm requirements. I don't know if this is the best way (underlying implementation of arrays, maybe a crazy built-in function does it better, who knows), but it seems reasonable to me. :) - Agor.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 because anything containing splice() is already O(n). Even if it doesn't internally create a new copy of the entire array, it potentially has to shunt all n items back 1 position if the element is to be inserted in position 0. –  j_random_hacker Jan 2 '11 at 8:19

Simple (Demo):

function sortedIndex(array, value, key) {
    var low = 0,
        high = array.length;

    while (low < high) {
        var mid = (low + high) >>> 1;
        if (array[mid] < value) low = mid + 1;
        else high = mid;
    }
    return low;
}
share|improve this answer

You should also take into consideration that depending on javascript implementation built in functions might be implemented in native code, and thus be a lot faster then your own JS code. And although your algorithm has lower complexity, sort + push might be faster.

share|improve this answer

Don't re-sort after every item, its overkill..

If there is only one item to insert, you can find the location to insert using binary search. Then use memcpy or similar to bulk copy the remaining items to make space for the inserted one. The binary search is O(log n), and the copy is O(n), giving O(n + log n) total. Using the methods above, you are doing a re-sort after every insertion, which is O(n log n).

Does it matter? Lets say you are randomly inserting k elements, where k = 1000. The sorted list is 5000 items.

  • Binary search + Move = k*(n + log n) = 1000*(5000 + 12) = 5,000,012 = ~5 million ops
  • Re-sort on each = k*(n log n) = ~60 million ops

If the k items to insert arrive whenever, then you must do search+move. However, if you are given a list of k items to insert into a sorted array - ahead of time - then you can do even better. Sort the k items, separately from the already sorted n array. Then do a scan sort, in which you move down both sorted arrays simultaneously, merging one into the other. - One-step Merge sort = k log k + n = 9965 + 5000 = ~15,000 ops

Update: Regarding your question.
First method = binary search+move = O(n + log n). Second method = re-sort = O(n log n) Exactly explains the timings you're getting.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, but no, it depends on your sort algorithm. Using a bubble sort in the reverse order, your sort if the last element is not sorted is always in o(n) –  njzk2 Oct 11 '12 at 7:40

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