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What is the reason not to use select *?

Could you explain what select_expr clause in SELECT statements is good for? I've been always using * for select_expr like this

SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE ...

and it was enough.

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marked as duplicate by Martin Smith, Jocelyn, Chris Lätta, rob mayoff, Corbin Nov 19 '12 at 6:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
what if one of the column is a BIG BLOG, contains few hundred MB of data .. and you actually don't need this column? –  ajreal Nov 18 '12 at 22:22

3 Answers 3

There are several reasons:

  • You can add calculated columns: select a, b, a+b FROM table
  • You can restrict the transferred data volume.
  • You can give individual columns a new name.
  • You can program more safely and performant.

Add to the first and second point: Especially usually require column restriction.

Add to the fourth point: When doing adhoc queries I'm almost always using *. But the programs should always enumerate the columns. This prevents surprising column reordering and also makes it clear what data is actually used.

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An example over and above the others already suggested:

  • You need to use aggregate functions:

    SELECT ID, COUNT(*) AS Num_Total
      FROM OrderItem
     GROUP BY OrderID;
    
  • You need to get information from two parts of a UNION query. I used this in an answer to another question recently:

    SELECT v1.ID AS OrderID_1, v1.NA AS NS, v2.ID AS OrderID_2, v2.NB AS NL, v3.NC AS NC
      FROM (SELECT ID, COUNT(*) AS NA
              FROM OrderItem
             WHERE OrderID = <specified order ID>
             GROUP BY OrderID
           ) AS v1
      JOIN (SELECT ID, COUNT(*) AS NB
              FROM OrderItem
             WHERE OrderID != <specified order ID>
             GROUP BY OrderID
           ) AS v2
        ON v1.NA <= v2.NB
      JOIN (SELECT I1.ID, COUNT(*) AS NC
              FROM OrderItem AS I1
              JOIN OrderItem AS I2 ON I2.ItemID = I1.ItemID AND I2.OrderID = <specified order ID>
             WHERE I1.OrderID != <specified order ID>
             GROUP BY I1.ID
           ) AS v3
        ON v3.ID = v2.ID
    UNION
    SELECT v2.ID AS OrderID_1, v2.NB AS NS, v1.ID AS OrderID_2, v2.NA AS NL, v3.NC AS NC
      FROM (SELECT ID, COUNT(*) AS NA
              FROM OrderItem
             WHERE OrderID = <specified order ID>
             GROUP BY OrderID
           ) AS v1
      JOIN (SELECT ID, COUNT(*) AS NB
              FROM OrderItem
             WHERE OrderID != <specified order ID>
             GROUP BY OrderID
           ) AS v2
        ON v1.NA > v2.NB
      JOIN (SELECT I1.ID, COUNT(*) AS NC
              FROM OrderItem AS I1
              JOIN OrderItem AS I2 ON I2.ItemID = I1.ItemID AND I2.OrderID = <specified order ID>
             WHERE I1.OrderID != <specified order ID>
             GROUP BY I1.ID
           ) AS v3
        ON v3.ID = v1.ID
    

At no point in that query was the Quantity column from the OrderItem table of any relevance to the computation I was doing. There's no way to write that query without using the 'select_expr' rather than 'SELECT *'. You might note that the initial 'aggregate function' suggestion is one of the sub-queries in this larger query (and it appears twice — you trust that the optimizer will optimize accurately).

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Imagine your table has a million columns, you were only interested in one, and you were speaking to your database over a network via a 30 baud connection.

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1  
table has million of columns? wow that's huge. –  John Woo Nov 18 '12 at 23:24
    
It was only a thought experiment :) (typo corrected, thanks) –  Laurence Nov 18 '12 at 23:27

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