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when I am working on shell script, I am little frusturate on $@ and "$@" problem. So, I write a shell script to do some testing. like following.

func()
{
    local a="$@"
    for i in "$a";  do
        echo "$i ****"
    done
}

func000()
{
    local a="$@"
    for i in $a;  do
        echo "$i ****"
    done
}

func0()
{
    local a=$@
    for i in "$a";  do
            echo "$i ****"
    done
}

func00()
{
    local a=$@
    for i in $a;  do
        echo "$i ****"
    done
}

func1()
{
    for i in "$@";  do
        echo "$i ****"
    done
}

func2() 
{
    for i in $@;  do
        echo "$i ****"
    done
}

func "a b c"
func a b c 

echo "-----------"
func0 "a b c"
func0 a b c 

echo "-----------"
func00 "a b c"
func00 a b c 

echo "-----------"
func000 "a b c"
func000 a b c 

echo "-----------"
func1 "a b c"
func1 a b c 

echo "-----------"
func2 "a b c"
func2 a b c 




a b c ****
a b c ****   func
-----------
a b c ****   func0
a b c ****
-----------
a ****       func00
b ****
c ****
a ****
b ****
c ****
------------
a ****   func000
b ****
c ****
a ****
b ****
c ****

-----------
a b c ****     func1   //this has the result that I want. 
a **** 
b ****
c ****
----------- 
a ****      func2
b ****
c ****
a ****
b ****
c ****

As far as I remember, when using $@, we have to use double quoate, otherwise something will break. Therefore, I know some of functions definitely not work properly. (I still test it anyway)

Only func1 gives me a desire result, however, the thing is I want to assign "$@" to a variable. by reviewing func0, func000, func0, func00 results, none of those give me correct stuff. So, I am hoping someone can help me out.

In addition, I know sh and bash has difference. If someone can point me out in which condition something could break I will be so glad. Thanks.


update

I should say, this result of this script, it comes to the version of bash or sh, or freebsd sh vs linux sh.

I could be wrong, if so, just point it out, thanks a lot.

in old sh, freebsd sh, in which we do not have array, obviously, array assignment could not get working, the alternative is to use string like what I did in func000, local a="$a"; for i in $a; do ...

If using linux sh 4.5 (tested), or bash, see my answer below.

share|improve this question
2  
You should always quote all expansions, not just $@. In most of your cases you are taking an array, converting it to a string an expecting to still have array elements. This is not the case. Also, you should work on your accept rate. –  jordanm Nov 18 '12 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

update, thanks to @jordanm, I realize this is the difference between bash and old sh version somehow.

this is a solution in bash or sh 4.2. in old sh, this might not be working.

  33 func3()                                                                         
  34 {                                                                               
  35     local a=("${@}")                                                            
  36                                                                                 
  37     for i in "${a[@]}"; do                                                      
  38         echo "$i ****"                                                          
  39     done                                                                        
  40 }        
share|improve this answer
    
$@ is not a variable, it's an array of variables. –  anishsane Nov 19 '12 at 6:13
    
$@ is not an array (${@[1]}, for example, is illegal). However, its behavior when quoted is special and array-like: "$@" is equivalent to "$1" "$2" "$3" ... (in contrast to "$*" which is essentially the same as "$1 $2 $3 $4"). –  chepner Nov 20 '13 at 14:29
    
local -a a=( "$@" ), if you want to explicitly declare it as an array. –  Charles Duffy yesterday
    
...btw, this should work in bash much older than 4.2 (but won't work in any baseline /bin/sh, as arrays are an extension... as is the local keyword, though it's common enough that IIRC even ash has it). –  Charles Duffy yesterday

While I'm not him, the first I ever heard of saving "${@}" in this way was when I randomly happened by Rich's sh tricks. There Rich offers many similarly helpful and most importantly portably safe methods to solve many common problems on his website, but here's an excerpt to address your current question:

Working with arrays

Unlike “enhanced” Bourne shells such as Bash, the POSIX shell does not have array types. However, with a bit of inefficiency, you can get array-like semantics in a pinch using pure POSIX sh. The trick is that you do have one (and only one) array — the positional parameters “$1”, “$2”, etc. — and you can swap things in and out of this array.

Replacing the contents of the “$@” array is easy:

set -- foo bar baz boo

Or, perhaps more usefully:

set -- *

What’s not clear is how to save the current contents of “$@” so you can get it back after replacing it, and how to programmatically generate these ‘arrays’. Try this function based on the previous trick with quoting:

save () {
 for i do printf %s\\n "$i" | sed "s/'/'\\\\''/g;1s/^/'/;\$s/\$/' \\\\/" ; done
echo " "
}

Usage is something like:

myarray=$(save "$@")
set -- foo bar baz boo
eval "set -- $myarray"
share|improve this answer

If you want to keep everything in quotes you could try this:

test() {
    local args="$@"
    for i in `echo "$args"`;  do
        echo "$i ****"
    done
}

test 1 2 3 4

Output:

~ $ ./test.sh 
1 ****
2 ****
3 ****
4 ****
share|improve this answer
    
Your test isn't really valid, since all of his examples have args that contain spaces, which your example would also break on. –  jordanm Nov 19 '12 at 4:59
    
Fair point. I hadn't fully understood the question. My test does treat a single quoted argument with spaces the same as several arguments. –  theon Nov 19 '12 at 9:16

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