Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to find all values in a Pandas dataframe that contain whitespace (any arbitrary amount) and replace those values with NaNs.

Any ideas how this can be improved?

Basically I want to turn this:

                   A    B    C
2000-01-01 -0.532681  foo    0
2000-01-02  1.490752  bar    1
2000-01-03 -1.387326  foo    2
2000-01-04  0.814772  baz     
2000-01-05 -0.222552         4
2000-01-06 -1.176781  qux     

Into this:

                   A     B     C
2000-01-01 -0.532681   foo     0
2000-01-02  1.490752   bar     1
2000-01-03 -1.387326   foo     2
2000-01-04  0.814772   baz   NaN
2000-01-05 -0.222552   NaN     4
2000-01-06 -1.176781   qux   NaN

I've managed to do it with the code below, but man is it ugly. It's not Pythonic and I'm sure it's not the most efficient use of pandas either. I loop through each column and do boolean replacement against a column mask generated by applying a function that does a regex search of each value, matching on whitespace.

for i in df.columns:
    df[i][df[i].apply(lambda i: True if re.search('^\s*$', str(i)) else False)]=None

It could be optimized a bit by only iterating through fields that could contain empty strings:

if df[i].dtype == np.dtype('object')

But that's not much of an improvement

And finally, this code sets the target strings to None, which works with Pandas' functions like fillna(), but it would be nice for completeness if I could actually insert a NaN directly instead of None.

Help!

share|improve this question
    
What you really want is to be able to use replace with a regex... (perhaps this should be requested as a feature). –  Andy Hayden Nov 18 '12 at 23:23
2  
I made a github issue for this feature: github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/2285 . Would be grateful for PRs! :) –  Chang She Nov 19 '12 at 0:00
    
Wishes come true! There is now a better answer –  BenjaminGolder Mar 3 '14 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

How about:

d = d.applymap(lambda x: np.nan if isinstance(x, basestring) and x.isspace() else x)

The applymap function applies a function to every cell of the dataframe.

share|improve this answer
    
What a nice improvement! I should have thought of this in retrospect, but got hung up on doing boolean replacements for some reason. One question - is there an advantage to doing the basestring check vs. just str(x).isspace()? –  Chris Clark Nov 18 '12 at 23:50
1  
@ChrisClark: Either one is fine, although I would guess that the isinstance will be a bit faster. –  BrenBarn Nov 18 '12 at 23:55
1  
The reference to "basestring" in the code above will not work in Python 3.... in that case, try using "str" instead. –  Spike Williams Feb 9 at 20:39

I think df.replace() does the job:

df = pd.DataFrame([
    [-0.532681, 'foo', 0],
    [1.490752, 'bar', 1],
    [-1.387326, 'foo', 2],
    [0.814772, 'baz', ' '],     
    [-0.222552, '   ', 4],
    [-1.176781,  'qux', '  '],         
], columns='A B C'.split(), index=pd.date_range('2000-01-01','2000-01-06'))

print df.replace(r'\s+', np.nan, regex=True)

Produces:

                   A    B   C
2000-01-01 -0.532681  foo   0
2000-01-02  1.490752  bar   1
2000-01-03 -1.387326  foo   2
2000-01-04  0.814772  baz NaN
2000-01-05 -0.222552  NaN   4
2000-01-06 -1.176781  qux NaN
share|improve this answer
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Ashkan Mobayen Khiabani Feb 21 '14 at 19:13
1  
Expanded to illustrate –  patricksurry Feb 21 '14 at 23:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.