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I'm trying to make a program where I read in a file with a bunch of text in it. I then take punctuation out and then I read in a file that has stop words in it. Both get read in and put into arrays. I'm trying to put the array of the general text file and put it in a hash. I'm not really sure what I'm doing wrong, but I'm trying. I want to do this so I can generate stats on how many words are repeated and what not, but I have to take out stop words and such.

Anyway here is what I have so far I put a comment #WORKING ON MERGING ARRAY INTO HASH that is where I'm working at. I don't think the way I'm trying to put the array into the hash is right, but I looked online and the %hash{array} = "value"; doesn't compile. so not sure how else to do it.

Thanks, if you have any questions for me I will respond back quickly.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

#Reading in the text file
my $file0="data.txt";
open(my $filehandle0,'<', $file0) || die "Could not open $file0\n";
my@words;
while (my $line = <$filehandle0>){
    chomp $line;
    my @word = split(/\s+/, $line); 
    push(@words, @word);
}
for (@words) {
    s/[\,|\.|\!|\?|\:|\;]//g;
}
my %words_count;  #The code I was told to add in this post. 
    $words_count{$_}++ for @words;

Next I read in the stop words I have in another array.

#Reading in the stopwords file
my $file1 = "stoplist.txt"; 
open(my $filehandle1, '<',$file1) or die "Could not open $file1\n";
my @stopwords;
while(my $line = <$filehandle1>){
    chomp $line;
    my @linearray = split(" ", $line);
    push(@stopwords, @linearray);
}
for my $w (my @stopwords) {
    s/\b\Q$w\E\B//ig; 
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Some notes about hashes in Perl... Problem description:

Anyway here is what I have so far I put a comment #WORKING ON MERGING ARRAY INTO HASH that is where I'm working at. I don't think the way I'm trying to put the array into the hash is right, but I looked online and the %hash{array} = "value"; doesn't compile. so not sure how else to do it.

At first, ask yourself why you want to "put the array into the hash". An array represents a list of values while a hash represents a set of key-value pairs. So you have to define what keys and values should be. Not only for us, but for you. It often helps to explain even simple things to get a better understanding.

In this case, you may want to count how often a given word $word occured in your @words array. This could be done by iterating over all words and increase $count{$word} by one each time. This is what @raina77ow did in his answer. Important here is, that you're accessing single hash values, which are represented with the scalar sigil $ in Perl. So if you have a hash named %count, you can increase the value for the key 'foo' by

$count{foo}++;

Your result of "online looking" above (%hash{array} = "value") doesn't make sense. There are three valid ways to store values in a hash:

set all key-value pairs by assingning a even-sized list to the whole hash:

%count = (hello => 42, world => 17);

set a single value for a given key by assigning a single value for a defined key (this is what we did before):

$count{hello} = 42;

set a list of values for a given list of keys using a so-called hash slice:

@count{qw(hello world)} = (42, 17);

Note the use of sigils here: % for a hashy even-sized list of keys and values mixed, $ for single (scalar) values and @ for lists of values. In your example you're using %, but define an array in the key braces {...} and assign a single scalar value.

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3  
+1, should be quite helpful for the OP. ) –  raina77ow Nov 18 '12 at 23:54
    
I think I need to read more about this scalar. It's much different then I though. And the rubber duck thing is an awesome tip. lol –  Kirs Kringle Nov 19 '12 at 0:01
3  
Oh, no rocket science here. Scalar values are just single atomic values like numbers or strings. But you may want to read more about Perl's basic types (scalars, arrays, hashes) and their sigils. :) –  memowe Nov 19 '12 at 0:16
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Well, if you have a list of words in @words array, and want to get a hash where each key refers to specific word, and each value is the quantity of this word appearances in the source array, it's done as simple as...

my %words_count;
$words_count{$_}++ for @words;

In other words (no pun intended), you iterate over @words array, for each member increasing by 1 the corresponding element of %words_count hash OR, when that element is not yet defined, essentially creating it with value 1 (so-called auto-vivification).

As a sidenote, calling keys function on arrays is close to meaningless: in 5.12+ it'll give you the list of indexes used instead, and before that, throw a syntax error at you.

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$words_count{$_}++ for @words; wont cause compilation errors? –  Kirs Kringle Nov 18 '12 at 23:32
2  
@KirsKringle why do you think it should? –  memowe Nov 18 '12 at 23:34
    
okay, I saw the keys used in another example I found. I've never used perl before and I'm very early in my programming career. I appreciate your help. –  Kirs Kringle Nov 18 '12 at 23:35
    
@memowe earlier I found something online where I tired to do the ++ like that and it gave me a compilation error. I'm going to try this though. –  Kirs Kringle Nov 18 '12 at 23:36
    
@KirsKringle I tried to explain some facts about Perl hashes and how to use them in my answer to clarify something. Hint: look at the sigils! –  memowe Nov 18 '12 at 23:51
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