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I'm trying to make a game with dice, and I need to have random numbers in it (to simulate the sides of the die. I know how to make it between 1 and 6). Using

#include <cstdlib> 
#include <ctime> 
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() 
{ 
    srand((unsigned)time(0)); 
    int i;
    i = (rand()%6)+1; 
    cout << i << "\n"; 
}

doesn't work very well, because when I run the program a few times, here's the output I get:

6
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
5
2

So I want a command that will generate a different random number each time, not the same one 5 times in a row. Is there a command that will do this?

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10  
Distribution issues aside, keep in mind that with random numbers comes the possibility of getting the same result several times in a row. If you were guaranteed not to get the same number twice in a row, the results wouldn't really be random, would they? –  cdhowie Nov 18 '12 at 23:25
1  
What makes you think those numbers aren't random? Throw a die for real and you very well could get that outcome. If they were guaranteed to be different between each throw then it wouldn't really be random would it. –  mattjgalloway Nov 18 '12 at 23:27
1  
Also read eternallyconfuzzled.com/arts/jsw_art_rand.aspx why using the modulus operator isn't often a good idea. –  Benjamin Bannier Nov 18 '12 at 23:29
1  
You're misunderstanding a lot more than one can fit in a comment or even an answer. You need to learn, independently, about pseudo-random number generators, about seeds, about the importance of picking a truly random seed, and about uniform distributions. –  Kerrek SB Nov 18 '12 at 23:33
6  
When you seed with time. This also means that if you run your program more than once a second you will get the same number. –  Loki Astari Nov 18 '12 at 23:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The most fundamental problem of your test application is that you call srand once and then call rand one time and exit.

The whole point of srand function is to initialize the sequence of pseudo-random numbers with a random seed. It means that if you pass the same value to srand in two different applications (with the same srand/rand implementation) you will get exactly the same sequence of rand() values read after that. But your pseudo-random sequence consists of one element only - your output consists of the first elements of different pseudo-random sequences seeded with time of 1 second precision. So what do you expect to see? When you happen to run application on the same second your result is the same of course (as Loki Astari already mentioned in a comment to the answer).

Actually you should call srand(seed) one time and then call rand() many times and analyze that sequence - it should look random.

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Using modulo may introduce bias into the random numbers, depending on the random number generator. See this question for more info. Of course, it's perfectly possible to get repeating numbers in a random sequence.

Try some C++11 features for better distribution:

#include <random>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::mt19937 rng;
    rng.seed(std::random_device()());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<std::mt19937::result_type> dist6(1,6); // distribution in range [1, 6]

    std::cout << dist6(rng) << std::endl;
}

See this question/answer for more info on C++11 random numbers. The above isn't the only way to do this, but is one way.

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The seed value should be std::random_device()(). –  Kerrek SB Nov 18 '12 at 23:34
    
@KerrekSB: Cool, I've add that. Thanks. –  Cornstalks Nov 18 '12 at 23:36
    
dist6 should be dist ? –  Recker Oct 3 '13 at 3:33
    
@abhinole: Ah! Good catch! –  Cornstalks Oct 5 '13 at 1:30
    
The amount of bias introduced by using %6 is vanishingly small. Maybe significant if you're writing a craps game to be used in Las Vegas, but of no consequence in almost any other context. –  Hot Licks May 8 '14 at 20:53

Here is a solution. Create a function that returns the random number and place it outside the main function to make it global. Hope this helps

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
int rollDie();
using std::cout;
int main (){
    srand((unsigned)time(0));
    int die1;
    int die2;
    for (int n=10; n>0; n--){
    die1 = rollDie();
    die2 = rollDie();
    cout << die1 << " + " << die2 << " = " << die1 + die2 << "\n";
}
system("pause");
return 0;
}
int rollDie(){
    return (rand()%6)+1;
}
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#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

int main() {
    srand(time(NULL));
    int random_number = std::rand(); // rand() return a number between ​0​ and RAND_MAX
    std::cout << random_number;
    return 0;
}

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/random/rand

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If you are using boost libs you can obtain a random generator in this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

// Used in randomization
#include <ctime>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>
#include <boost/random/variate_generator.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

int current_time_nanoseconds(){
    struct timespec tm;
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &tm);
    return tm.tv_nsec;
}

int main (int argc, char* argv[]) {
    unsigned int dice_rolls = 12;
    random::mt19937 rng(current_time_nanoseconds());
    random::uniform_int_distribution<> six(1,6);

    for(unsigned int i=0; i<dice_rolls; i++){
        cout << six(rng) << endl;
    }
}

Where the function current_time_nanoseconds() gives the current time in nanoseconds which is used as a seed.


Here is a more general class to get random integers and dates in a range:

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>
#include <boost/random/variate_generator.hpp>
#include "boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp"
#include "boost/date_time/gregorian/gregorian.hpp"


using namespace std;
using namespace boost;
using namespace boost::posix_time;
using namespace boost::gregorian;


class Randomizer {
private:
    static const bool debug_mode = false;
    random::mt19937 rng_;

    // The private constructor so that the user can not directly instantiate
    Randomizer() {
        if(debug_mode==true){
            this->rng_ = random::mt19937();
        }else{
            this->rng_ = random::mt19937(current_time_nanoseconds());
        }
    };

    int current_time_nanoseconds(){
        struct timespec tm;
        clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &tm);
        return tm.tv_nsec;
    }

    // C++ 03
    // ========
    // Dont forget to declare these two. You want to make sure they
    // are unacceptable otherwise you may accidentally get copies of
    // your singleton appearing.
    Randomizer(Randomizer const&);     // Don't Implement
    void operator=(Randomizer const&); // Don't implement

public:
    static Randomizer& get_instance(){
        // The only instance of the class is created at the first call get_instance ()
        // and will be destroyed only when the program exits
        static Randomizer instance;
        return instance;
    }
    bool method() { return true; };

    int rand(unsigned int floor, unsigned int ceil){
        random::uniform_int_distribution<> rand_ = random::uniform_int_distribution<> (floor,ceil);
        return (rand_(rng_));
    }

    // Is not considering the millisecons
    time_duration rand_time_duration(){
        boost::posix_time::time_duration floor(0, 0, 0, 0);
        boost::posix_time::time_duration ceil(23, 59, 59, 0);
        unsigned int rand_seconds = rand(floor.total_seconds(), ceil.total_seconds());
        return seconds(rand_seconds);
    }


    date rand_date_from_epoch_to_now(){
        date now = second_clock::local_time().date();
        return rand_date_from_epoch_to_ceil(now);
    }

    date rand_date_from_epoch_to_ceil(date ceil_date){
        date epoch = ptime(date(1970,1,1)).date();
        return rand_date_in_interval(epoch, ceil_date);
    }

    date rand_date_in_interval(date floor_date, date ceil_date){
        return rand_ptime_in_interval(ptime(floor_date), ptime(ceil_date)).date();
    }

    ptime rand_ptime_from_epoch_to_now(){
        ptime now = second_clock::local_time();
        return rand_ptime_from_epoch_to_ceil(now);
    }

    ptime rand_ptime_from_epoch_to_ceil(ptime ceil_date){
        ptime epoch = ptime(date(1970,1,1));
        return rand_ptime_in_interval(epoch, ceil_date);
    }

    ptime rand_ptime_in_interval(ptime floor_date, ptime ceil_date){
        time_duration const diff = ceil_date - floor_date;
        long long gap_seconds = diff.total_seconds();
        long long step_seconds = Randomizer::get_instance().rand(0, gap_seconds);
        return floor_date + seconds(step_seconds);
    }
};
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