Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's the piece of the code:

fire_coord_x = 350.0
fire_coord_y = 350.0

while not done:

    fire_vel_x = 0.0
    fire_vel_y = 0.0
    fire_speed = 4.0

        if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
            if event.button == 1:
                screen.blit(fire1,[fire_coord_x,fire_coord_y])

As you can see, I've used the conditional "if" to blit the fire1 image to the screen, when I press the mouse button. The problem is: The fire disappears. I've even tried to do this:

    if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
        if event.button == 1:
            screen.blit(fire1,[fire_coord_x,fire_coord_y])
    if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONUP:
        if event.button == 1:
            screen.blit(fire1,[fire_coord_x,fire_coord_y])

Thinking that the "MOUSEBUTTONUP" would keep the image forever there. But, it failed miserably. So, I would like to ask for some techniques to solve this problem. How can I press the mouse button and create the image, in a way that the image STAYS there? Moving the fire image in the weapon's direction is a future problem.

For memory reasons, it would be interesting to drestroy every image created in an offset place at some point.

Thank you very much!

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

MOUSEBUTTONDOWN event

  1. Start with a empty sprite.Group named bullets
  2. When MOUSEBUTTONDOWN append a Bullet Sprite to bullets.
  3. in your main draw loop, call bullets.draw()

For memory reasons, it would be interesting to drestroy every image created in an offset place at some point.

You would actually only have one single surface in memory, that all the bullets (Sprites) use. It would only be free'd if 100% of the bullets where to die. The main bottleneck would likely be collision on very large numbers of bullets. You can improve this using QuadTree's.

QuadTree demo

Mouse down as a state

If you want holding LMB to fire a machine gun, like a FPS does, then you instead will

  1. use mouse.get_pressed() to check the mouse down state.
  2. If pressed, and time elapsed since last bullet >= 300ms, then spawn bullet. (Else ignore this loop.)
share|improve this answer
    
This is a more complex example, but it seems to be perfect. I'll try to implement it. Thank you very much, monkey. –  Ericson Willians Nov 20 '12 at 4:33
add comment
background = 0,0,0

pressed = 0
fire1 = pygame.image.load("path/to/fire1")
fire_coord_x = 350
fire_coord_y = 350
while 1:
for event in pygame.event.get():
    if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
        sys.exit()
    if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
        pressed = 1
    if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONUP:
        pressed = 0

screen.fill(background) 
if pressed == 1:
    screen.blit(fire1,[fire_coord_x,fire_coord_y])

pygame.display.flip()

Does this seem helpful? Is this what you wanted to do?

This will create a fire1 whenever you press the button and it will disappear if you stop pressing.

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty interesting! I've tried, but it's not exactly what I want. Because the bullets disappear as well. It was useful as a lesson, thank you very much! :). I need to click and fire, and the bullets need to still exist when I release the mouse button. –  Ericson Willians Nov 20 '12 at 4:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.