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My form has hundreds of controls: menus, panels, splitters, labels, text boxes, you name it.

Is there a way to disable every control except for a single button?

The reason why the button is significant is because I can't use a method that disables the window or something because one control still needs to be usable.

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1  
Should you put the button in a separate form? –  SLaks Nov 19 '12 at 0:28
    
Can't you just loop through all of the controls on the form, setting the Enabled property on each? In your loop, ignore the button by using its ID/name. Or, go ahead and disable everything in the loop, then immediately after that enable the button. –  Bob Horn Nov 19 '12 at 0:28

3 Answers 3

You can do a recursive call to disable all of the controls involved. Then you have to enable your button and any parent containers.

 private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        DisableControls(this);
        EnableControls(Button1);
    }

    private void DisableControls(Control con) {
        foreach (Control c in con.Controls) {
            DisableControls(c);
        }
        con.Enabled = false;
    }

    private void EnableControls(Control con) {
        if (con != null) {
            con.Enabled = true;
            EnableControls(con.Parent);
        }
    }
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Why would you include the ref keyword there? –  Bob Horn Nov 19 '12 at 0:43
    
I wouldn't. I was on the phone while typing it and for some reason it just came out –  pinkfloydx33 Nov 19 '12 at 0:53
    
Ha. Well done. I like how you made the methods not know or care about any specific controls. Newbies overlook things like that. –  Bob Horn Nov 19 '12 at 1:00
    
@BobHorn - good point but the code doesn't not account for all control properties. It would break if used on a custom control that doesn't support Enabled –  Jeremy Thompson Nov 19 '12 at 2:05

For a better, more elegant solution, which would be easy to maintain - you probably need to reconsider your design, such as put your button aside from other controls. Then assuming other controls are in a panel or a groupbox, just do Panel.Enabled = False.

If you really want to keep your current design, you can Linearise ControlCollection tree into array of Control to avoid recursion and then do the following:

Array.ForEach(Me.Controls.GetAllControlsOfType(Of Control), Sub(x As Control) x.Enabled = False)
yourButton.Enabled = True
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1  
+1 for mentioning reconsidering the design. –  Bob Horn Nov 19 '12 at 1:00

Based on @pinkfloydx33's answer and the edit I made on it, I created an extension method that makes it even easier, just create a public static class like this:

public static class GuiExtensionMethods
{
        public static void Enable(this Control con, bool enable)
        {
            if (con != null)
            {
                foreach (Control c in con.Controls)
                {
                    c.Enable(enable);
                }

                try
                {
                    con.Invoke((MethodInvoker)(() => con.Enabled = enable));
                }
                catch
                {
                }
            }
        }
}

Now, to enable or disable a control, form, menus, subcontrols, etc. Just do:

this.Enable(true); //Will enable all the controls and sub controls for this form
this.Enable(false);//Will disable all the controls and sub controls for this form

Button1.Enable(true); //Will enable only the Button1

So, what I would do, similar as @pinkfloydx33's answer:

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
        this.Enable(false);
        Button1.Enable(true);
}

I like Extension methods because they are static and you can use it everywhere without creating instances (manually), and it's much clearer at least for me.

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