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Suppose I have a number of Particles in X,Y space, and I want to normalise them all such that the average X and Y are 0.

Serial implementation:

public void Normalise()
{
  double avgX = 0.0;
  double avgY = 0.0;

  foreach (Particle p in Particles)
  {
    avgX += p.X;
    avgY += p.Y;
  }

  avgX /= (double)Particles.Count;
  avgY /= (double)Particles.Count;

  foreach (Particle p in Particles)
  {
    p.X -= avgX;
    p.Y -= avgY;
  }
}

This works, and the performance is not bad since it's O(n), but it's "embarrassingly parallel". Take a look at my PLINQ implementation:

public void PNormalise()
{
  double avgX = 0.0;
  double avgY = 0.0;

  Particles.AsParallel().ForAll(p =>
  {
    avgX += p.X;
    avgY += p.Y;
  });

  avgX /= (double)Particles.Count;
  avgY /= (double)Particles.Count;

  Particles.AsParallel().ForAll(p =>
  {
    p.X -= avgX;
    p.Y -= avgY;
  });
}

I'm not sure about the performance here, but I would imagine it's better. The problem is, the particles are all jumping around randomly. I can only assume that the += operations on avgX and avgY are competing against each other, even though they're fairly atomic already.

Is there anything I can do to fix it? I can't lock them because they're not objects, but I'm not sure I'd want to anyway because isn't locking quite expensive?

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There's no such thing as “fairly atomic”, an operation either is atomic, or it isn't. –  svick Nov 19 '12 at 20:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can bypass the need for a lock (or atomic operations) via the normal machinery of Parallel LINQ:

var avgX = Particles.AsParallel().Average(p => p.X);
var avgY = Particles.AsParallel().Average(p => p.Y);

Particles.AsParallel().ForAll(p => { p.X -= avgX; p.Y -= avgY });

Since summing the numbers is an O(N) operation, I would be extremely surprised if this part took any significant portion of time.

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I'm loving LINQ more and more every day... –  Ozzah Nov 19 '12 at 1:15

Use

Particles.AsParallel().ForAll(p =>
{
    Interlocked.Add(avgX, p.X);
    Interlocked.Add(avgY, p.Y);
}

to do a thread-safe atomic addition. For more information see the documentation of the Interlocked Class.

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A better solution may be to do a Parallel sum which automatically handles this for you. –  Mike Bantegui Nov 19 '12 at 1:10
1  
Interlocked.Add only overloads (ref int, int) and (ref long, long), but I'm using double –  Ozzah Nov 19 '12 at 1:13

Actually, parallelizing this O(n)-Algorithm won't result in a much better Performance, since you have roughly the same amount of memory accesses as computational instructions.

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I don't know if the JIT complier does it, but it is very possible it could change the instructions to SIMD instructions via the SSE processor extensions. Here is a blog with some more information about the CLR and extensions like SSE –  Scott Chamberlain Nov 19 '12 at 1:29
    
Yes, but the algorithm is still memory bound, so the CPU is still mostly idle, but the few work it is doing is now evenly distributed among its cores. –  Mathias Becher Nov 19 '12 at 1:35
    
@MathiasBecher: O(N) problems like this are actually very nice with parallelism. If your problem size grows bigger, you can, for the most part, throw more hardware at it to perform at a similar level as before. I agree though that it may be a bit trivial unless you have something like N = 10^7. –  Mike Bantegui Nov 19 '12 at 2:01

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