Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to remove entries from a data frame which occur less than 100 times. The data frame data looks like this:

pid   tag
1     23    
1     45
1     62
2     24
2     45
3     34
3     25
3     62

Now I count the number of tag occurrences like this:

bytag = data.groupby('tag').aggregate(np.count_nonzero)

But then I can't figure out how to remove those entries which have low count...

share|improve this question
    
As @unutbu suggests, please consider changing the accepted answer on this (filter method is simpler :) ) –  Andy Hayden Feb 28 at 21:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Edit: Thanks to @WesMcKinney for showing this much more direct way:

data[data.groupby('tag').pid.transform(len) > 1]

import pandas
import numpy as np
data = pandas.DataFrame(
    {'pid' : [1,1,1,2,2,3,3,3],
     'tag' : [23,45,62,24,45,34,25,62],
     })

bytag = data.groupby('tag').aggregate(np.count_nonzero)
tags = bytag[bytag.pid >= 2].index
print(data[data['tag'].isin(tags)])

yields

   pid  tag
1    1   45
2    1   62
4    2   45
7    3   62
share|improve this answer
5  
a cute one-liner: data[data.groupby('tag').pid.transform(len) > 1] –  Wes McKinney Nov 25 '12 at 5:53
2  
We now have the filter method for this. –  Dan Allan Dec 10 '13 at 2:52

New in 0.12, groupby objects have a filter method, allowing you to do these types of operations:

In [11]: g = data.groupby('tag')

In [12]: g.filter(lambda x: len(x) > 1)  # pandas 0.13.1
Out[12]:
   pid  tag
1    1   45
2    1   62
4    2   45
7    3   62

The function (the first argument of filter) is applied to each group (subframe), and the results include elements of the original DataFrame belonging to groups which evaluated to True.

Note: in 0.12 the ordering is different than in the original DataFrame, this was fixed in 0.13+:

In [21]: g.filter(lambda x: len(x) > 1)  # pandas 0.12
Out[21]: 
   pid  tag
1    1   45
4    2   45
2    1   62
7    3   62
share|improve this answer
    
I wonder if the ordering of the result not being in the same order is intentional... –  Andy Hayden Aug 21 '13 at 12:52
2  
Thanks for coming back to this question to preach the gospel of filter. The reordering is a known issue that I should have included in the docs. The order is maintained if you set dropna=False. If not, the groups may be shuffled. Resorting them would cost time, so I left that to the user, which was a debatable choice. –  Dan Allan Aug 21 '13 at 13:12
    
@DanAllan Also if there is repeated/unordered index it may be non-trivial to put them back in order. Ah ha, currently you can do: g.filter(lambda x: len(x) > 1, dropna=False).dropna() to keep the order. –  Andy Hayden Aug 21 '13 at 13:23
    
@DanAllan oh no you can't... as reindexing doesn't work with repeats. So filter doesn't work. Mind you, nor does transform. –  Andy Hayden Aug 21 '13 at 13:26
1  
@sashkello: Please consider making this the accepted answer. It is simpler and is the right way to do it going forward. –  unutbu Feb 28 at 20:57
df = pd.DataFrame([(1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 1),(2,2,)], columns=['col1', 'col2'])

In [36]: df
Out[36]: 
   col1  col2
0     1     2
1     1     3
2     1     4
3     2     1
4     2     2

gp = df.groupby('col1').aggregate(np.count_nonzero)

In [38]: gp
Out[38]: 
      col2
col1      
1        3
2        2

lets get where the count > 2

tf = gp[gp.col2 > 2].reset_index()
df[df.col1 == tf.col1]

Out[41]: 
   col1  col2
0     1     2
1     1     3
2     1     4
share|improve this answer
    
For some reason I'm getting empty set... –  sashkello Nov 19 '12 at 2:18
    
Now I've got the idea. Another way of doing this could be to join these data frames, it will remove the non-matching entries and I can drop count column afterwards. –  sashkello Nov 19 '12 at 2:22
1  
jep that would work 2. i usually just use a mask and then select the cols i need –  locojay Nov 19 '12 at 2:25

You could create a mask on your aggregate:

bytag = data.groupby('tag').aggregate(np.count_nonzero)
mask = bytag.pid >= 100
filtered_dataframe = bytag[mask]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.