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So, I've written this code that should effectively estimate the area under the curve of the function defined as h(x). My problem is that i need to be able to estimate the area to within 6 decimal places, but the algorithm i've defined in estimateN seems to be using too heavy for my machine. Essentially the question is how can i make the following code more efficient? Is there a way i can get rid of that loop?

h = function(x) {
    return(1+(x^9)+(x^3))
}
estimateN = function(n) {
    count = 0
    k = 1
    xpoints = runif(n, 0, 1)
    ypoints = runif(n, 0, 3)
    while(k <= n){
    if(ypoints[k]<=h(xpoints[k]))
        count = count+1
    k = k+1
    }
    #because of the range that im using for y
    return(3*(count/n))
}
#uses the fact that err<=1/sqrt(n) to determine size of dataset
estimate_to = function(i) {
    n = (10^i)^2
    print(paste(n, " repetitions: ", estimateN(n)))
}

estimate_to(6)
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1  
estimate_to(6) might be a little too greedy: your current algorithm will likely make R run out of memory trying to allocate numeric vectors of length 1e12. –  flodel Nov 19 '12 at 2:19
    
If you really need 1e12 simulations, you'll have to rewrite your algorithm so it finds a compromise between computation times and memory usage. –  flodel Nov 19 '12 at 2:26
    
The best way to make Monte Carlo integration (much) more efficient, i.e. get the same precision within less iterations, is to use importance sampling, for example Metropolis Monte Carlo. In your case points with x closer to 1.0 contribute more to the value of the integral than those closer to 0.0. –  Hristo Iliev Nov 19 '12 at 9:44
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Replace this code:

count = 0
k = 1
while(k <= n){
if(ypoints[k]<=h(xpoints[k]))
    count = count+1
k = k+1
}

With this line:

count <- sum(ypoints <= h(xpoints))
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1  
I think that sums up the power of vectorization pretty eloquently. –  Ari B. Friedman Nov 19 '12 at 2:12
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