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I have created an extension method as such..

public static bool AllFlagsSet<T>(this T input, params T[] values) where T : struct, IConvertible
{
    bool allSet = true;
    int enumVal = input.ToInt32(null);

    foreach (T itm in values)
    {
        int val = itm.ToInt32(null);
        if (!((enumVal & val) == val)) 
        {
            allSet = false;
            break;
        }
    }

    return allSet;
}

Which works great for the purposes I needed, however I now have a requirement to create a method with the same signature which checks if only exclusively those values have been set.

Basically something like this.

public static bool OnlyTheseFlagsSet<T>(this T input, params T[] values) where T : struct, IConvertible
{
}

The only way I can think of doing this is by getting all available enumeration values checking which are set and confirming that only the two provided have been.

Is there another way to solve this problem using some sort of bitwise operation?

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Is this a homework?? And why is T constraint to a struct and not an enum?? –  LightStriker Nov 19 '12 at 2:31
    
lol, well that's embarrassing. Nope, just don't have a firm grasp of bitwise operations yet... This is a real requirement –  Maxim Gershkovich Nov 19 '12 at 2:32
    
Try constraining it to Enum and see what happens. ;-p –  Maxim Gershkovich Nov 19 '12 at 2:33
    
Ah, God. I like to dig in some weird unsupported stuff. The CLI claims enum constraint exist, but the CLR doesn't support it. Anyway, you could do an Enum extension instead, that would constraint to Enum type without the weird stuff. –  LightStriker Nov 19 '12 at 2:54
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Do "or" on all required flags and compare with input - should be equal. Similar to following, with correct loop to compute value on the left:

var onlyTheseFlagsSet = (value[0] | value[1]) == input;
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Exclusivity requirement means that

input = values[0] | values[1] | ... | values[values.Length - 1]

So, here is your implementation:

return input.ToInt32(null) == values.Aggregate(0, 
       (total, next) => total | next.ToInt32(null));
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+1. That .ToInt32(null) looks strange, but works nevertheless! –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 19 '12 at 3:16
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This flips the bit of each input value. If only those are set, the resulting value will be zero. Otherwise, it will flip bits to 1 if the value is not set in input which will leave the value non-zero.

public static bool OnlyTheseFlagsSet<T>(this T input, params T[] values) where T : struct, IConvertible
{
    int enumVal = input.ToInt32(null);

    foreach (T itm in values)
    {
        int val = itm.ToInt32(null);
        enumVal = enumVal ^ val;                
    }

    return (enumVal == 0);
}
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1  
+1. I like | approach, but this one is interesting too. Side note - please avoid shrtng nms f vrbls like itm instead of item. –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 19 '12 at 3:18
    
I like the | approach more too. Agreed on variable names, I was just keeping the original author's style. –  Patrick Quirk Nov 19 '12 at 3:49
    
Side note: just noticed - your code relies on values being mutually exclusive... not necessray true even for values of Enum marked as flags. –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 19 '12 at 4:38
    
@AlexeiLevenkov - Could you please be kind enough to explain that statement further? –  Maxim Gershkovich Nov 19 '12 at 23:51
1  
@MaximGershkovich, enum {Hidden=1, Readonly=2, System=4, ReallyHidden=7}. If you try to use [Hidden, ReallyHidden] as list of values bit for 1 will be flipped twice. –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 19 '12 at 23:56
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Am I missing something or could you not just sum params T[] values and check if input equals the result?
If you want just those flags and no others, the input should equal the sum of those flags.

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1  
Sum as + may be dangerous since Enum values even for flags types does not have to be mutually exclusive - one need to use or | to combine flags properly. –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 19 '12 at 3:16
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Assuming you can convert your input to a enum:

foreach(MyFlags flag in values)
    if (!input.HasFlag(flag))
        return false;

return true;

Yes, I'm lazy like that.

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I think OP wants to also make sure other flags are not set... waiting for OP's comments... –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 19 '12 at 3:12
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