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please excuse my newbie format. I am trying to get a pass by ref function to read from an existing file from first position to last position. I was atttempting to have it read and display the files contents by first using seekg to read how many characters or bytes are in the file. I have been using bits and pieces from my professors examples and the textbook. I have a feeling it is more of an issue with my function then the organization. It compiles and it appears to count right but not displaying the contents of the arrays.txt file. Any help would be appreciated as always.

//  Using Bloodshed...

#include <iostream.h>
#include <fstream.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

char x;
void calcFunc(fstream&, char&, long&, long&);
int main()
{

    fstream file;
    char ch, choice;
    long offset, last, first;

    file.open("arrays.txt");
    if (file.fail())
    {
        cout << " file name cannot be found \n";
        system("pause");
        exit(1);
    }

    cout << "Hello You!  Please choose Option A,B,C, or D:   " << endl << endl;;

    cout << "A.  READ THE FILE FROM FIRST POSITION TO LAST. " << endl;
    cout << "B.  READ THE FILE FROM THE LAST TO THE FIRST IN REVERSE." << endl;
    cout << "C.  READ THE FILE FROM FIRST POSITION TO  ANY PLACE." << endl;
    cout << "D.  READ FILE FROM ANY PLACE TO ANY PLACE. " << endl << endl;
    cout << "A, B, C, OR D,: ";
    cin >> choice;

    cout << endl << endl;

    switch (choice)
    {

    case 'A':
        file.seekg(0L, ios::end);
        last = file.tellg();
        cout << last;
        system("pause");
        calcFunc(file, ch, offset, last);
        cout << offset << "  " << last << "  " << x << "  " << ch;
        system("pause");

        break;

    default:
        cout << "please enter appropriate value";
    }



    return (0);
}

void calcFunc(fstream& file, char& x, long& offset, long& last)
{
    for (offset = last; offset > 0; offset--)
    {
        x = file.get();
        cout << x;
        return x;
    }
}
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2  
What was your question again? –  mvp Nov 19 '12 at 2:59
    
how does my function definition look to display the contents of the file? –  delgadough Nov 19 '12 at 3:06
    
You should be posting this on the code review site of stack exchange... –  Sidharth Mudgal Nov 19 '12 at 3:08
    
What is the intended effect of the line return x inside your calcFunc function (which, note, has return-type void)? And -- does your compiler really not give you any warning-messages? –  ruakh Nov 19 '12 at 3:13
1  
First determining the file size, and then blindly reading that amount is a rather troublesome practise. I hope your professor didn't tell you to do it this way, but reckon they did... the much smoother and safer way is to just read values until you've reached the end, i.e. until file.eof(). –  leftaroundabout Nov 19 '12 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

The only problem that I see (so far) is the use of return x. It's not needed unless calcFunc returns char and x fulfills some condition and you want to stop the loop and return because of it. I would simply take it out.

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