Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a way to pass a variable amount of parameters to a function in this circumstance:

template<typename ...T>
struct Lunch
{
    Lunch(T...){}
};

template<typename T>
T CheckLuaValue(lua_State* luaState,int index)
{
    //Do Stuff
    return value;
}

template <class MemberType, typename ReturnType, typename... Params>
struct MemberFunctionWrapper <ReturnType (MemberType::*) (Params...)>
{
    static int CFunctionWrapper (lua_State* luaState)
    {
        ReturnType (MemberType::*)(Params...) functionPointer = GetFunctionPointer();
        MemberType* member = GetMemberPointer();

        int index = 1;

        //Get a value for each type in Params
        Lunch<Params...>
        {
           (CheckLuaValue<Params>(luaState,index), index++, void(), 0)...
        };

CheckLuaValue returns a value for each type in Params. My problem is that I now need a way to call my function with all of those values

        member->*functionPointer(returnedLuaValues); 

    }
};

How would I go about doing this?

share|improve this question
1  
How does CheckLuaValue return its values? As a tuple? –  Yakk Nov 19 '12 at 3:08
    
CheckLuaValue returns a single value –  sFuller Nov 19 '12 at 3:48
    
Ah. Is that the comma operator I see? Anyhow, this stack overflow might be useful, it has a whole bunch of stuff on ...ing parameters: stackoverflow.com/questions/12030538/… –  Yakk Nov 19 '12 at 4:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So I stole some of Luc Danton's sequence advice to sFuller and Pubby (about sequences), and I generated this "stop messing around with operator," version:

#include <iostream>
struct lua_State {};
template<typename T>
T CheckLuaValue( int n, lua_State* l)
{
    std::cout << "arg[" << n << "] gotten\n";
    return T(n);
}

template<int ...>
struct seq { };

// generates a seq< First, ..., Last-1 > as "type"
template<int First, int Last>
struct gen_seq
{
  template<int N, int... S>
  struct helper : helper<N-1, N-1, S...> {};
  template<int... S>
  struct helper<First, S...> {
    typedef seq<S...> type;
  };
  typedef typename helper<Last>::type type;
};

template< typename X >
struct MemberFunctionWrapper;

template< typename F >
struct MemberFunctionHelper
{
    typedef F MethodPtr;
};
template<class InstanceType, typename ReturnType, typename... Params>
struct MemberFunctionWrapper< ReturnType(InstanceType::*)(Params...) >
{
  typedef MemberFunctionHelper<ReturnType(InstanceType::*)(Params...)> Helper;
  typedef typename Helper::MethodPtr MethodPtr;
  static MethodPtr& GetFunctionPointer() {static MethodPtr pFunc; return pFunc;}
  static InstanceType*& GetMemberPointer() {static InstanceType* pThis;return pThis;}
  template<int n, typename Param>
  static auto GetLuaValue( lua_State* luaState )->decltype(CheckLuaValue<Param>(n,luaState))
  {
    return CheckLuaValue<Param>(n,luaState);
  }

  template< typename sequence >
  struct call;

  template< int... I >
  struct call<seq<I...>>
  {
    ReturnType operator()( lua_State* luaState, InstanceType* instance, MethodPtr method ) const
    {
      return (instance->*method)( GetLuaValue<I,Params>( luaState )... );
    }
  };
  static int CFunctionWrapper( lua_State* luaState)
  {
    MethodPtr func = GetFunctionPointer();
    InstanceType* instance = GetMemberPointer();
    ReturnType retval = call< typename gen_seq< 1, sizeof...(Params)+1 >::type >()( luaState, instance, func );
    return 0;
  }
};

struct test{ int foo(int x, double d){std::cout << "x:" << x << " d:" << d << "\n";}};
int main(){
    typedef MemberFunctionWrapper< int(test::*)(int, double) > wrapper;
    test bar;
    wrapper::GetFunctionPointer() = &test::foo;
    wrapper::GetMemberPointer() = &bar;
    wrapper::CFunctionWrapper(0);
}

now, note that the calls to CheckLuaValue can be out of order (ie, it can ask for arg 2 from Lua before arg 1), but the right one will be passed to the right argument.

Here is a test run: http://ideone.com/XVmQQ6

share|improve this answer

If I understand correctly, you should change the definition Lunch to invoke the member function pointer:

template <class MemberType, typename ReturnType, typename... Params>
struct MemberFunctionWrapper <ReturnType (MemberType::*) (Params...)>
{
  template<typename ...T>
  struct foo // new Lunch
   {
     foo(ReturnType (MemberType::*)(Params...) functionPointer, MemberType* member, T... args){
       member->*functionPointer(args...);
     }
   };

   static int CFunctionWrapper (lua_State* luaState)
    {
        ReturnType (MemberType::*)(Params...) functionPointer = GetFunctionPointer();
        MemberType* member = GetMemberPointer();

        int index = 1;
        //member->*(bindedMemberFunction->memberFunction);

        //Get a value for each type in Params
        foo<Params...>
        {
           functionPointer,
           member,
           (++index, CheckLuaValue<Params>(luaState,index))...
        };
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't MemberType member in the constructor be MemberType* member ? –  sFuller Nov 19 '12 at 4:10
    
@sFuller Yeah, I didn't compile it so there might be a few syntax errors. –  Pubby Nov 19 '12 at 4:18
2  
Parameter arguments are not guaranteed to execute in order. How are you guaranteeing that index++ is evaluated in the right order here? Ie, the compiler could evaluate argument 7, then argument 0, then argument 3. I'm guessing that some of those commas are the comma operator? -- which makes me wonder how it is supposed to work (as foo<...> is called with a bunch of 0s?), plus I suspect you might want to comment the use of the comma operator when you use it in the middle of calling a function. :) –  Yakk Nov 19 '12 at 4:22
2  
@Yakk Comma operator has a sequence point and using brace enclosed initializer syntax enforces left-to-right ordering. sFuller seems to know this. The , 0 is to work around void functions, although this is clearly incorrect here. –  Pubby Nov 19 '12 at 4:30
1  
@sFuller Syntax when using ptmf's should always be (a.*b)(c, ..., z) or (a->*b)(c, ..., z). –  Luc Danton Nov 19 '12 at 5:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.