Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The codes are below:

<label>radio 1 </label>
<input type="radio" onchange="$('input2').show()" id="radio1" name="RadioGroup">
<label>radio 2 </label>
<input type="radio" onchange="$('input2').show()" id="radio2" name="RadioGroup">
<label>radio 3 </label>
<input type="radio" onchange="$('input2').hide()" id="radio3" name="RadioGroup">

<input type="text" id="input2">

There might be two drawbacks of these codes:

  1. the jquery codes for onchange have to be written three times
  2. the onchange codes will only be executed when I click/change one of the radio. In other words, these codes would not be executed when the page is initialized. For example, if the radio3 is being checked when the page is initialized, the input2 will still be displayed..

Does anyone have ideas about how to solve these issues? Thanks!

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Matt Whipple, Peter O., carlosfigueira, finnw, Tom Redfern Nov 19 '12 at 8:51

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
using inline jQuery must be some form of blasphemy. You should be using unobtrusive JavaScript –  Matt Whipple Nov 19 '12 at 3:15
    
For #2 you want to extract the logic out into either a declared function that has the logic or handler for a custom event. Then you either call the function or trigger the event on page load. Considering 1 & 2 together you may as well put all of the information in the same function. Give the radios the same name and the inputs the same class. Get the value of the radio element, hide all inputs with that class except for the proper one for the selected radio. –  Matt Whipple Nov 19 '12 at 3:19
1  
@MattWhipple Browsers that don't understand onchange will ignore it, so that's already unobtrusive; whether it's good practice is another thing. –  Jack Nov 19 '12 at 3:36
    
@Jack part of unobtrusive JavaScript is the separation of the behavior from the markup, having inline event handlers breaks this idea. jQuery's event binding is easy and flexible because it is the preferred approach. –  Matt Whipple Nov 19 '12 at 3:51
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I did a quick jsfiddle that reorganizes this a bit.

1) assign a class to any of the radio buttons that show the input 2) assign another class to any radio button that hides the input 3) attach an event in the jQuery document.ready in a separate js file that manages the actions.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Kw4gu/2/

HTML

<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
<label>radio 1 </label>
<input type="radio" class="open" name="radioGroup" id="radio1">
<label>radio 2 </label>
<input type="radio" class="open" name="radioGroup"   id="radio2">
<label>radio 3 </label>
<input type="radio" class="close" name="radioGroup"   id="radio3">

<input type="text" id="input2">

​JS

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".open").on("change", function(event) {

        $('#input2').show();
    });

    $(".close").on("change", function(event) {

        $('#input2').hide();
    });
});​
share|improve this answer
    
Don't use "live" - it has been deprecated in jQuery. Use "on" instead. –  JasCav Nov 19 '12 at 3:55
    
thanks, edited, to use on :D –  m4nw17h4pl4n Nov 19 '12 at 4:00
add comment

One thing you could do is set the event handlers via Javascript instead of bundling them in the HTML like that. Use a jquery selector to select the radio buttons and then add the events in a single place.

Doing things via Javascript also gives you more flexibility on when to initialize the code, how you run things, etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do this a couple different ways, but it's fairly straightforward in jQuery. I've updated your HTML a bit (gave the two similar buttons a common class for easier selection AND I gave all buttons the same name so they are part of the same button group).

<label>radio 1 </label>
<input type="radio" class="radioButton" id="radio1" name="buttonGroup">
<label>radio 2 </label>
<input type="radio" class="radioButton" id="radio2" name="buttonGroup">
<label>radio 3 </label>
<input type="radio" id="radio3" name="buttonGroup">

<input type="text" id="input2">​

Now, you have to write your selectors to hide or show the field depending on which button is being selected. That is shown here:

$(function() {
    $('#input2').hide();

    $('.radioButton').on('change', function() {
        $('#input2').show();
    });
    $('#radio3').on('change', function() {
        $('#input2').hide();
    });
});​

Note, I started off within $('#input2').hide(); just to hide it initially, but I would do something like that in CSS normally.

In any case, you can see an example of this working at this jsFiddle example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.