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For each creation of the object, I want it to be uniquely accessible by an identifier. I am using an incrementing static value to keep track of how many objects have been created, and every time a new one is constructed, I make its identifier equivalent to count + 1 (and increment the count). The problem I am encountering is that synchronization is not working. Here is a simplified version of the code:

public static final Hashtable MODULES = new Hashtable();
private static final Object countLock = new Object();
private static int count = 0;
private final String identifier;
private final String name;

public Class(String name) {
    this.identifier = String.valueOf(incrementCount());
    this.name = name;
    MODULES.put(identifier, name);
}

private static int incrementCount() {
     synchronized (countLock) {
        return ++count;
    }
}

Now when I test with this (unrealistically, admittedly, but to be sure that it works):

    for (int x = 0; x < 100; x++) {
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                Class m = new Class("Name");
            }
        }).start();
    }
    System.out.println(Module.MODULES.size());

I get output anywhere from the 60's to 100. Obviously I don't want that sort of unreliability. Would a volatile field work here? (I have tried with the same results) I am not sure how to make sure every class object has a different identifier. Any solutions are welcome.

Note: I do not access to java.util.concurrent for implementation specific reasons.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your lock is working fine but the problem is something different. You are initializing the each object through a new Thread. While the threads are running in background, the main thread, prints the count at moment. Put an appropriate delay in between, you will see the proper count.

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException{
    for (int x = 0; x < 100; x++) {
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                Counter m = new Counter("Name");
            }
        }).start();
    }
    Thread.sleep(1000);//put a delay
    System.out.println(MODULES.size());
}
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Thanks very much. I feel stupid. :( –  Joel Gallant Nov 19 '12 at 4:42
    
@joelg236: Don't feel bad. We make mistakes and learn from them. It continues. –  Yogendra Singh Nov 19 '12 at 4:47

Try this:

 for (int x = 0; x < 100; x++) {
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                Class m = new Class("Name");
            }
        }).start();
    }

    Thread.sleep(500);

    System.out.println(Module.MODULES.size());
share|improve this answer
    
what's the logic behind using sleep. If I need to do this with out any sleep what should I do? for real life system there's a lot of cases where you can't delay. besides you are sleeping the main thread. What if the main thread is the main listener thread of a web server? Are you not going to lost some valuable requests? –  Debobroto Das Nov 19 '12 at 4:44
    
No, you start printing before all thread started. Pause gives all threads a chance to start. You can do it differently, but make sure that all threads have started then print –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Nov 19 '12 at 6:03

You are printing the size of hashtable which is not synchronized. add a synchronized statement before the statement MODULES.put(identifier, name);

synchronized (MODULES) {
        MODULES.put(identifier, name);
    }

it works for me.

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Here is what I see as a problem in your code: The statement Class m = new Class("Name"); is in the run() function, and not in the constructor of Runnable's implementation in your code.

If I have to write a similar code, I would write it this way:

public class ModuleTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (int x = 0; x < 100; x++) {
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            {
                Module m = new Module("Name");
            }
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // do something
            }
        }).start();
    }
    System.out.println(Module.MODULES.size());
    }
}

Look at the placement of statement Module m = new Module("Name"); above. It is not in run() function, as run() is called when start() is called. That statement is between unnamed braces {} that is called during construction of the anonymous implementation of Runnable you have in your code.

And to complete the above code, here is the Module class:

import java.util.Hashtable;

public class Module {

    public static final Hashtable MODULES = new Hashtable();
    private static final Object countLock = new Object();
    private static int count = 0;
    private final String identifier;
    private final String name;

    public Module(String name) {
        this.identifier = String.valueOf(incrementCount());
        this.name = name;
        MODULES.put(identifier, name);
    }

    private synchronized static int incrementCount() {
            return ++count;
    }
}
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