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Using the getopt function included in unistd.h in C++, is there a way to structure the optstring such that...

[-a] [-f "reg_expr"] out_file1 [[-f "reg_expr"] out_file2 ...] is possible?

This is a homework assignment, but the emphasis is not on this specific subtask.

In my head I would like to specify the following logic:

(a argument), (infinitely many f arguments with 2 required (sub)arguments),... (infinitely many generic arguments)

Perhaps my understanding of the getopt function is fundamentally flawed. I also saw a getopt_long. Perhaps that is what I'm missing.

I originally drafted this, which worked, but I came across the getopt function and thought it might do a better job.

int outFileFlags;
int outFileMode = S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IROTH;
int i = 1;
while (i < argc){
    if (i == 1 && strcmp( argv[i], "-a") == 0){
        cout << "append flag set" << endl;
        outFileFlags = O_RDWR | O_APPEND;
        i++;
        continue;
    }
    else {
        outFileFlags = O_TRUNC | O_RDWR | O_CREAT;
    }
    if (strcmp( argv[i], "-f") == 0 && i+2 <= argc){
        cout << "   regx = " << argv[i+1] << endl;
        cout << "   fn = " << argv[i+2] << endl;
        i = i+3;
        continue;
    }
    else {
        cout << "   regx = none" << endl;
        cout << "   fn = " << argv[i] << endl;
        i++;
        continue;
    }
}

Note: assume this is written for a unix environment. I don't think I can use anything from the standard library. I only included std::cout for testing purposes.

I will be happy to elaborate on any details of the assignment. However, the main question revolves around the syntax of the optstring. I am currently only aware of : meaning required and :: meaning optional is there a way to specify arguments that repeat like a regex wildcard *?

EDIT:

I'm sure this is sloppy due to the fact that I don't think getopt is designed to handle multiple arguments per option but it does the trick...

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    char c;
    int iterations = 0;
    while (*argv) {
        optind = 1;
        if (iterations == 0){
            opterr = 0;
            c = getopt(argc, argv, "a");
            if(c == 'a'){
                //~ APPEND SET
            }
            else if(c=='?'){
                optind--;
            }
        }
        while ((c = getopt(argc, argv, "f:")) != -1) {
            if (c == 'f'){
                //~ REGEX = optarg
                if (optind < argc && strcmp(argv[optind], "-f") != 0) {
                    //~ FILENAME = argv[optind]
                    optind++;
                }
                else {
                    errno = 22;
                    perror("Error");
                    exit(errno);
                }
            }
            else {
                errno = 22;
                perror("Error");
                exit(errno);
            }
        }
        argc -= optind;
        argv += optind;
        iterations++;
        //~ REMAINING FILES = *argv
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to do a separate getopt loop for each group of options and output filename.

group_index = 0;
while (*argv) {
  optreset = 1;
  optind = 1;
  while ((ch = getopt(argc, argv, "af:")) != -1) {
    switch (ch) {
      /* process options */
    }
  }
  argc -= optind;
  argv += optind;
  outfile[group_index++] = *argv;
  argc--;
  argv++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think that won't work with GNU getopt, which by default rearranges the argv vector to allow processing trailing options. You can specify '+' as the first character of the argument specifier or set the oddly-named environment variable POSIXLY_CORRECT to get Posix-compliant behaviour. –  rici Nov 19 '12 at 5:58
    
argc -= optind; argv += optind; outfile[group_index++] = *argv; argc--; argv++; I don't understand this part. Could you please explain what it is doing? Also, I dont see optreset here : gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/… What does this do? –  Matthew Jacobus Nov 20 '12 at 18:09
    
After each group of options and output filename, it's updating argv to point to the remaining arguments, and argc to be the count of remaining arguments, so that you can call getopt again to process them. getopt only understands the convention of having all options before filenames. What I wrote is just a small variant of an example in the getopt man page. –  Barmar Nov 20 '12 at 18:14

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