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How do I put the #stranger div in between the #mother and #child? Right now, the #stranger div covers both the #mother and #child!

<head> 
  <style>
  #mother{
    position:absolute;
    display:block;
    width:300px;
    height:300px;
    background-color:green;
    padding:40px;
    z-index:1000;
  }
  #child{
    position:relative;
    display:block;
    width:180px;
    height:180px;
    background-color:yellow;
    z-index:6000;
  }
  #stranger{
    position:relative;
    display:block;
    width:300px;
    height:600px;
    background-color:black;
    z-index:1500;
  }
  </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>Z-index Test</h1>
    <h1>How Do I put #stranger between #mother and #child?</h1>
    <div id='mother'>
        <div id='child'></div>
    </div>
    <div id='stranger'></div>
  </body>
  </html>
share|improve this question
1  
That sounds so wrong... –  BoltClock Nov 19 '12 at 5:03
    
I would upvote if I had no ethical conscience. –  Emanegux Feb 15 '13 at 19:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's because #child is nested inside of #mother. If #mother is lower than #stranger, #mother's #child is lower than stranger, too. See this explanation of stacking context.

You would get the result I think you expect if your markup was like so:

<body>
    <div id='mother'></div>
    <div id='child'></div>
    <div id='stranger'></div>
</body>

Then they would all be in the same stacking context.

share|improve this answer
    
thx, but I thought I made it between b4 even they r parent and child,now I can't, weird.So if I put stranger into mother div and become her child will works too. –  user1743251 Nov 19 '12 at 5:30

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