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class Invoice
  def Invoice.generate(order_id, charge_amount, credited_amount = 0.0)
    Invoice.new(:order_id => order_id, :amount => charge_amount, :invoice_type => PURCHASE, :credited_amount => credited_amount)
  end
end

Why would you create Invoice.generate inside Invoice class rather than self.generate?

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2  
self is usually recommended. Refactoring would be a pain otherwise –  oldergod Nov 19 '12 at 5:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

self.generate is easier to work with, whereas Invoice.generate is arguably more explicit. Other than that, there's no difference between the two.

Explanation

You can define a method on any instance using this form

def receiver.method(args) 
end

Check this out

class Foo
end

def Foo.bar
  "bar"
end

Foo.bar # => "bar"

And yes, I mean any instance. It's absolutely possible that one instance has some method while another doesn't

f = Foo.new

def f.quux
  'quux'
end

f2 = Foo.new

f.quux # => "quux"
f2.quux # => # ~> -:20:in `<main>': undefined method `quux' for #<Foo:0x007fe4e904a6c0> (NoMethodError)

A reminder: inside of class definition (but outside of method definitions) self points to that class.

class Foo
  # self is Foo
end

So, armed with this knowledge, the difference between self.generate and Invoice.generate should be obvious.

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Under normal circumstances, it would practically have no difference from def self.generate.

The only edge case I can think of is if you have a nested class with the same name, then the explicit version would apply only to the nested class.

class A
  def self.x
    name
  end

  def A.y
    name
  end

  class A 
    # nested class A::A
  end

  def self.p
    name
  end

  def A.q
    name
  end
end

> A.x # => "A"
> A.y # => "A"
> A.p # => "A"
> A.q # => NoMethodError: undefined method `q' for A:Class
> A::A.q # => "A::A"

As you see, after a nested class with the same name is defined, subsequent explicit class method definitions made with the class name refer to the nested class, but explicit definitions made beforehand refer to the original.

Implicit definitions made with self always refer to the base class.

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You have 2 ways for defining a class method.

1) You can use the name of the class directly

class Test #Test is now an instance of a built-in class named Class
  def Test.class_method
    "I'm a class method."
  end
end

2) You can use the self variable, which is always pointing to the current object

class Test
  def self.class_method
    "I'm a class method."
  end
end

Once you understand that classes are objects, this use of the self variable to define a class method finally makes sense.

The value of self

Not too surprinsingly, when you are inside a class method, the value of self refers to the object that holds the class structure (the instance of class Class). This means that :

class Test
  def self.class_method
    self.x
  end
end

is equivalent to :

class Test
  def self.class_method
    Test.x
  end
end

When you are inside an instance method, the value of self still refers to the current object. This time however, the current object is an instance of class Test, not an instance of class Class.

More info. : http://www.jimmycuadra.com/posts/self-in-ruby

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