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I think this is a basic misunderstanding about how to manage dependency properties but I can't seem to find a clear example to correct me.

Looking at the following code as an example...

public class MyControl
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ExpressionProperty = 
                                    DependencyProperty.Register("Expression",
                                    typeof (Expression),
                                    typeof (MyControl),
                                    new PropertyMetadata(ExpressionChanged));

    public Expression Expression
    {
        get { return (Expression)GetValue(ExpressionProperty); }
        set { SetValue(ExpressionProperty, value); }
    }

    private static void ExpressionChanged(DependencyObject dependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs dependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
    {
        ... Must respond to external change of property
        ... Update UI to reflect external change to property
    }

    private void RespondToInput()
    {
        ... Do something to expression, add new elements or something
        ... Now expression has changed so I want to update the dependency property
        ... so datacontext gets new value.
        SetValue(ExpressionProperty, updatedExpression);
    }
}

What I don't understand is that when I do the RespondToInput work, I want to now update the DependencyProperty, but if I do, the PropertyChanged callback is called, at which point I go in a circle and now start updating the UI, even though I initiated the change from the UI effectively.

I don't know if that makes enough sense.

What did I do wrong??

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps just a typo. You set the ownerType argument to DependencyProperty.Register to ExpressionRichTextBox, although the property is defined in class MyControl. –  Clemens Nov 19 '12 at 10:29
    
Sorry yes, typo! Fixed thanks! –  Adam Nov 19 '12 at 13:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't prevent the PropertyChangedCallback from being called when the property value changes. What you can do is not to react on an internal property change:

private bool isInternalExpressionChanged;

private static void ExpressionChanged(DependencyObject dependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs dependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
{
    if (!isInternalExpressionChanged)
    {
        ...
    }
}

private void RespondToInput()
{
    ...
    isInternalExpressionChanged = true;
    SetValue(ExpressionProperty, updatedExpression);
    isInternalExpressionChanged = false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I've done, but it feels all wrong. I keep thinking I've not understood correctly how to handle the public property, the dependency property, and the internal management of the value. Perhaps it is the only way, is that the general consensus? –  Adam Nov 19 '12 at 13:27
    
The "public property" is the dependency property and (from application code) that is the internal value. You simply can't distinguish. –  Clemens Nov 19 '12 at 15:35
    
I'm glad you came up with the same approach I did, at least I'm not completely off base. It stills feels somehow like it's not quite right, but it does work, so all good for now! Thanks for the help/reassurance. –  Adam Dec 6 '12 at 7:38

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