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Is it a good or bad idea to make setters in java return "this"?

public Employee setName(String name){
   this.name = name;
   return this;
}

This pattern can be useful because then you can chain setters like this:

list.add(new Employee().setName("Jack Sparrow").setId(1).setFoo("bacon!"));

instead of this:

Employee e = new Employee();
e.setName("Jack Sparrow");
...and so on...
list.add(e);

...but it sort of goes against standard convention. I suppose it might be worthwhile just because it can make that setter do something else useful. I've seen this pattern used some places (e.g. JMock, JPA), but it seems uncommon, and only generally used for very well defined APIs where this pattern is used everywhere.

Update:

What I've described is obviously valid, but what I am really looking for is some thoughts on whether this is generally acceptable, and if there are any pitfalls or related best practices. I know about the Builder pattern but it is a little more involved then what I am describing - as Josh Bloch describes it there is an associated static Builder class for object creation.

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4  
gotta get those setters to pull their weight –  Ken Liu Aug 28 '09 at 4:42
2  
Last I heard, void return type will equal to return this; in Java7, whenever that comes out. –  Esko Aug 28 '09 at 5:42
2  
if this behavior is supported in Java 7, then maybe it makes sense to write my code this way to support a future programming style? –  Ken Liu Aug 28 '09 at 16:17
    
Since I've seen this design pattern a while ago, I do this wherever possible. If a method doesn't explicitly need to return something to do its job, it now returns this. Sometimes, I even alter the function so that instead of returning a value, it operates on a member of the object, just so I can do this. It's wonderful. :) –  Inversus Apr 17 at 9:42

18 Answers 18

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I don't think there's anything specifically wrong with it, it's just a matter of style. It's useful when:

  • You need to set many fields at once (including at construction)
  • you know which fields you need to set at the time you're writing the code, and
  • there are many different combinations for which fields you want to set.

Alternatives to this method might be:

  1. One mega constructor (downside: you might pass lots of nulls or default values, and it gets hard to know which value corresponds to what)
  2. Several overloaded constructors (downside: gets unwieldy once you have more than a few)
  3. Factory/static methods (downside: same as overloaded constructors - gets unwieldy once there is more than a few)

If you're only going to set a few properties at a time I'd say it's not worth returning 'this'. It certainly falls down if you later decide to return something else, like a status/success indicator/message.

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well, generally you don't return anything from a setter anyway, by convention. –  Ken Liu Aug 28 '09 at 4:39
6  
Maybe not to start with, but a setter doesn't necessarily keep its original purpose. What used to be a variable might change into a state that encompasses several variables or have other side effects. Some setters might return a previous value, others might return a failure indicator if failure is too common for an exception. That raises another interesting point though: what if a tool/framework you're using doesn't recognise your setters when they have return values? –  Tom Clift Aug 28 '09 at 4:54
4  
@Tom good point, doing this breaks the "Java bean" convention for getters and setters. –  Andy White Aug 28 '09 at 4:57
    
@TomClift Does breaking "Java Bean" convention cause any issues? Are libraries that use the "Java Bean" convention looking at the return type or just the method parameters and the method name. –  Theo Briscoe Dec 5 '13 at 14:30

It's not bad practice. It's an increasingly common practice. Most languages don't require you to deal with the returned object if you don't want to so it doesn't change "normal" setter usage syntax but allows you to chain setters together.

This is commonly called a builder pattern or a fluent interface.

It's also common in the Java API:

String s = new StringBuilder().append("testing ").append(1)
  .append(" 2 ").append(3).toString();
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6  
It's often used in builders, but I wouldn't say "this is ... called a Builder pattern". –  Laurence Gonsalves Aug 28 '09 at 4:31
6  
It's funny to me that some of the rationale for fluent interfaces is that they make code easier to read. I could see it being more convenient to write, but it kinda strikes me as being harder to read. That's the only real disagreement I have with it. –  Brent Nash Aug 28 '09 at 4:36
1  
Probably the ultimate incarnation of fluent interfaces is LINQ –  cletus Aug 28 '09 at 4:45
18  
It's also known as train-wreck antipattern. Problem is that when an null-pointer exception stack trace contains a line like this, you have no idea which invocation returned null. That's not to say that chaining should be avoided at all costs, but beware of bad libraries (esp. home-brewn). –  ddimitrov Mar 2 '10 at 14:49
7  
@ddimitrov aslong as you limit it to returning this it would never be a problem (only the first invokation could throw NPE) –  Stefan Oct 24 '12 at 20:24

To summarize:

  • it's called a "fluent interface", or "method chaining".
  • this is not "standard" Java, although you do see it more an more these days (works great in jQuery)
  • it violates the JavaBean spec, so it will break with various tools and libraries, especially JSP builders and Spring.
  • it may prevent some optimizations that the JVM would normally do
  • some people think it cleans code up, others think it's "ghastly"

A couple other points not mentioned:

  • This violates the principal that each function should do one (and only one) thing. You may or may not believe in this, but in Java I believe it works well.

  • IDEs aren't going to generate these for you (by default).

  • I finally, here's a real-world data point. I have had problems using a library built like this. Hibernate's query builder is an example of this in an existing library. Since Query's set* methods are returning queries, it's impossible to tell just by looking at the signature how to use it. For example:

    Query setWhatever(String what);
    
  • It introduces an ambiguity: does the method modify the current object (your pattern) or, perhaps Query is really immutable (a very popular and valuable pattern), and the method is returning a new one. It just makes the library harder to use, and many programmers don't exploit this feature. If setters were setters, it would be clearer how to use it.

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thanks for this answer; I appreciate the real-world perspective. –  Ken Liu Sep 2 '09 at 4:18
2  
btw, it's "fluent", not "fluid"...as in it lets you structure a series of method calls like a spoken language. –  Ken Liu Sep 3 '09 at 12:29

I prefer using 'with' methods for this:

public String getFoo() { return foo; }
public void setFoo(String foo) { this.foo = foo; }
public Employee withFoo(String foo) {
  setFoo(foo);
  return this;
}

Thus:

list.add(new Employee().withName("Jack Sparrow")
                       .withId(1)
                       .withFoo("bacon!"));
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2  
+1 For interesting convention. I'm not going to adopt it in my own code since it seems like now you have to have a get, a set and a with for every class field. It's still an interesting solution, though. :) –  Paul Manta Jun 21 '11 at 20:44
    
It depends on how often you call the setters. I've found that if those setters get called a lot, it's worth the extra trouble to add them since it simplifies the code everywhere else. YMMV –  qualidafial Oct 24 '11 at 20:55
2  
And if you added this to Project Lombok's @Getter/@Setter annotations... that'd be fantastic for chaining. Or you could use something a lot like the Kestrel combinator (github.com/raganwald/Katy) that JQuery and Javascript fiends use. –  Ehtesh Choudhury Mar 28 '12 at 19:18
    
@qualidafial - I think there's a mistake in the code. withFoo(...) should declare Employee as return value - not String. –  AlikElzin-kilaka Jul 1 '13 at 11:26
    
Also, can you point to some popular libraries using this pattern? –  AlikElzin-kilaka Jul 1 '13 at 11:27

If you don't want to return 'this' from the setter but don't want to use the second option you can use the following syntax to set properties:

list.add(new Employee()
{{
    setName("Jack Sparrow");
    setId(1);
    setFoo("bacon!");
}});

As an aside I think its slightly cleaner in C#:

list.Add(new Employee() {
    Name = "Jack Sparrow",
    Id = 1,
    Foo = "bacon!"
});
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1  
I like this, just another reason to learn C# –  Carson Myers Aug 28 '09 at 5:08
7  
double brace initialization may have problems with equals because it creates an anonymous inner class; see c2.com/cgi/wiki?DoubleBraceInitialization –  Csaba_H Aug 28 '09 at 5:59
    
I dont like this, just another reason do not learn C# –  msangel Jan 5 at 18:42
    
@Csaba_H Clearly that problem is the fault of the person who bungled the equals method. There are very clean ways to deal with anonymous classes in equals if you know what you are doing. –  AJMansfield Jan 24 at 20:07

I don't know Java but I've done this in C++. Other people have said it makes the lines really long and really hard to read, but I've done it like this lots of times:

list.add(new Employee()
    .setName("Jack Sparrow")
    .setId(1)
    .setFoo("bacon!"));

This is even better:

list.add(
    new Employee("Jack Sparrow")
    .Id(1)
    .foo("bacon!"));

at least, I think. But you're welcome to downvote me and call me an awful programmer if you wish. And I don't know if you're allowed to even do this in Java.

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The "even better" does not lend well to the Format Source code functionality available in modern IDE's. Unfortunately. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 28 '09 at 6:13
    
you're probably right... The only auto-formatter I have used is emacs' auto indenting. –  Carson Myers Aug 29 '09 at 0:21
    
Source code formatters can be coerced with a simple // after each method call in the chain. It uglies up your code a little, but not as much having your vertical series of statements reformatted horizontally. –  qualidafial Dec 20 '10 at 19:40

At least in theory, it can damage the optimization mechanisms of the JVM by setting false dependencies between calls.

It is supposed to be syntactic sugar, but in fact can create side effects in the super-intelligent Java 43's virtual machine.

That's why I vote no, don't use it.

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7  
Interesting...could you expand on this a bit? –  Ken Liu Aug 28 '09 at 4:51
    
Agreed, I'd like to know more about how this can affect optimization –  Carson Myers Aug 28 '09 at 5:06
2  
Just think about how superscalar processors deal with parallel execution. The object to execute the second set method on is dependent on the first set method although it is known by the programmer. –  Marian Aug 28 '09 at 21:51
    
I still don't follow. If you set Foo and then Bar with two separate statements, the object for which you're setting Bar has a different state than the object for which you're setting Foo. So the compiler couldn't parallelize those statements, either. At least, I don't see how it could without introducing an unwarranted assumption.(Since I have no idea about it, I won't deny that Java 43 does in fact do the parallelization in the once case but not the other and introduce the unwarranted assumption in the one case but not the other). –  masonk Feb 27 '11 at 1:18
3  
If you don't know, test. -XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions -XX:+PrintInlining The java7 jdk definitely inlines chained methods, and does around the same number of iterations it takes to mark void setters as hot and inline them too. Methinks you underestimate the power of the JVM's opcode pruning algorithms; if it knows you are returning this, it will skip the jrs (java return statement) opcode and just leave this on the stack. –  Ajax Feb 1 '13 at 15:11

This scheme (pun intended), called a 'fluent interface', is becoming quite popular now. It's acceptable, but it's not really my cup of tea.

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2  
Ha! Scheme! I see what you did there. –  Crashworks Aug 28 '09 at 4:32
1  
Crashworks: The scheme pun was a side-effect, I was mainly pointing out the pun on 'this'. Nice to see it works on multiple levels though :P –  Noon Silk Aug 28 '09 at 4:37
1  
You're clever without even trying! –  Pierreten Apr 1 '10 at 15:44
1  
As Maddox said: thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=puns –  ssg Apr 16 '10 at 6:26
    
Crashworks: What procedure did you call to induce the side-effect? –  Thomas Eding Aug 9 '11 at 0:47

Because it doesn't return void, it's no longer a valid JavaBean property setter. That might matter if you're one of the seven people in the world using visual "Bean Builder" tools, or one of the 17 using JSP-bean-setProperty elements.

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It also matters if you use bean-aware frameworks like Spring. –  ddimitrov Mar 2 '10 at 14:54
    
or if you use the introspection API to write reflective code... –  Dan Vinton May 20 '10 at 14:36

I used to prefer this approach but I have decided against it.

Reasons:

  • Readability. It makes the code more readable to have each setFoo() on a separate line. You usually read the code many, many more times than the single time you write it.
  • Side effect: setFoo() should only set field foo, nothing else. Returning this is an extra "WHAT was that".

The Builder pattern I saw do not use the setFoo(foo).setBar(bar) convention but more foo(foo).bar(bar). Perhaps for exactly those reasons.

It is, as always a matter of taste. I just like the "least surprises" approach.

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I agree on the side effect. Setters that return stuff violates their name. You are setting foo, but you get an object back? Is this a new object or have I altered the old? –  crunchdog Aug 28 '09 at 5:52

Paulo Abrantes offers another way to make JavaBean setters fluent: define an inner builder class for each JavaBean. If you're using tools that get flummoxed by setters that return values, Paulo's pattern could help.

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1  
I'd upvote, but your link is broken. –  cdunn2001 Dec 14 '11 at 16:09
1  
@cdunn2001, use wayback machine, Luke –  msangel Jan 5 at 18:52

On first sight: "Ghastly!".

On further thought

list.add(new Employee().setName("Jack Sparrow").setId(1).setFoo("bacon!"));

is actually less error prone than

Employee anEmployee = new Employee();
anEmployee.setName("xxx");
...
list.add(anEmployee);

So quite interesting. Adding idea to toolbag ...

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1  
No, it's still ghastly. From a maintenance perspective, the latter is better because it's easier to read. Additionally, automated code checkers like CheckStyle will enforce lines to be 80 characters by default - the code would get wrapped anyway, compounding the readability/maintainence issue. And finally - it's Java; there's no benefit to writing everything on a single line when it's going to be compiled to byte code anyway. –  OMG Ponies Aug 28 '09 at 4:52
1  
personally, I think the former is easier to read, especially if you are creating several objects this way. –  Ken Liu Aug 28 '09 at 4:53
    
@Ken: Code a method. Write one copy in fluent format; another copy in the other. Now give the two copies to a couple of people, and ask which one they find easier to read. Faster to read, faster to code. –  OMG Ponies Aug 28 '09 at 4:57
    
Like most tools, it can be easy to overuse. JQuery is oriented around this technique and is thus prone to long call chains which I've found actually impairs readability. –  staticsan Aug 28 '09 at 5:18

In general it’s a good practice, but you may need for set-type functions use Boolean type to determine if operation was completed successfully or not, that is one way to. In general, there is no dogma to say that this is good or bed, it comes from the situation of course.

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1  
How about using exceptions to indicate error condition? Error codes can be easily ignored as many C programmers painfully have learned. Exceptions can bubble up the stack to the point where they can be handled. –  ddimitrov Mar 2 '10 at 14:59

I'm in favor of setters having "this" returns. I don't care if it's not beans compliant. To me, if it's okay to have the "=" expression/statement, then setters that return values is fine.

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This may be less readable

list.add(new Employee().setName("Jack Sparrow").setId(1).setFoo("bacon!")); 

or this

list.add(new Employee()
          .setName("Jack Sparrow")
          .setId(1)
          .setFoo("bacon!")); 

This is way more readable than:

Employee employee = new Employee();
employee.setName("Jack Sparrow")
employee.setId(1)
employee.setFoo("bacon!")); 
list.add(employee); 
share|improve this answer
4  
I think it's pretty readable if you don't try to put all your code on one line. –  Ken Liu May 20 '10 at 18:05

Yes, I think it's a good Idea.

If I could add something, what about this problem :

class People
{
    private String name;
    public People setName(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
        return this;
    }
}

class Friend extends People
{
    private String nickName;
    public Friend setNickName(String nickName)
    {
        this.nickName = nickName;
        return this;
    }
}

This will work :

new Friend().setNickName("Bart").setName("Barthelemy");

This will not be accepted by Eclipse ! :

new Friend().setName("Barthelemy").setNickName("Bart");

This is because setName() returns a People and not a Friend, and there is no PeoplesetNickName.

How could we write setters to return SELF class instead of the name of the class ?

Something like this would be fine (if the SELF keyword would exist). Does this exist anyway ?

class People
{
    private String name;
    public SELF setName(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
        return this;
    }
}
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1  
There are a few other Java compilers besides Eclipse that won't accept that :). Basically, you're running fowl of the Java type system (which is static, not dynamic like some scripting languages): you'll have to cast what comes out of setName() to a Friend before you can setNickName() on it. So, unfortunately, for inheritance hierarchies this eliminates much of the readability advantage and renders this otherwise potentially-useful technique not-so-useful. –  Cornel Masson Jun 4 '12 at 9:39
4  
Use generics. class Chainable <Self extends Chainable> { public Self doSomething(){return (Self)this;} } It's not technically type safe (it will class cast if you implement the class with a Self type you cannot be case to), but it is correct grammar, and subclasses will return their own type. –  Ajax Feb 1 '13 at 15:17

From the statement

list.add(new Employee().setName("Jack Sparrow").setId(1).setFoo("bacon!"));

i am seeing two things

1) Meaningless statement. 2) Lack of readability.

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I have been making my setters for quite a while and the only real issue is with libraries that stick with the strict getPropertyDescriptors to get the bean reader/writer bean accessors. In those cases, your java "bean" will not have the writters that you would expect.

For example, I have not tested it for sure, but I would not be surprised that Jackson won't recognizes those as setters when creating you java objects from json/maps. I hope I am wrong on this one (I will test it soon).

In fact, I am developing a lightweight SQL centric ORM and I have to add some code beyong getPropertyDescriptors to recognized setters that returns this.

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