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With the help of some people on here I managed to find the stopping values for a range of initial values 1 to 1000 in the Collatz function. Collatz function (My mistake was sorted by using a new variable say s instead of c in the for loop and then letting c=s).

I am now trying to produce code to keep track of the maximum stopping value (count) for these initial values (1 to 1000) and then output it at the end. Could anyone give me some pointers if they know how to do this?

Thanks.

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what's the difference between stopping values, which you have found, and maximum stopping values, which you want help with? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 19 '12 at 8:55
    
with the (corrected) code in the link a stopping value is found for 1 to 1000. So 1000 stopping values, which may not all be different. I want to find the maximum one of these. There could be more than one with the same maximum value. –  S F Nov 19 '12 at 9:02
    
Define a maximum of zero before running the loop the first time. Then check if your stop value is greater than the current maximum value: If so set the current maximum to the current stop. Repeat this every time you found a stop value. Btw: These are basics of programming, so you probably should get along with these first before trying to program harder problems. –  mistapink Nov 19 '12 at 9:10

1 Answer 1

Define a maximum of zero before running the loop the first time. Then check if your stop value is greater than the current maximum value: If so set the current maximum to the current stop. Repeat this every time you found a stop value.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
long max = 0;
for(long c=2, c<=1000; c++) // define stopping value as 0 for c=1 elsewhere
{
long count=0;

while (c!=1)
{
    if((c%2)==0)
    {
        c/=2;
    }
    else
    {
        c=3*c+1;

    }

    count ++;
}

if ( count > max ) max = count;
cout << "The stopping value for " << c << " is " << count << endl;

}

cout << "The max stopping value is " << max << endl;
return 0;
}
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Thanks a lot. I nearly had this before but I hadn't defined max outside the for loop. –  S F Nov 19 '12 at 10:40

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