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I have following

class base
{
};

class derived : public base
{
  public:
   derived() {}
   void myFunc() { cout << "My derived function" << std::endl; }

};

now I have

base* pbase = new dervied();
  pbase->myFunc();

I am gettingg error myFunc is not a memember function of base.

How to avoid this? and how to make myFunc get called?

Note i should have base class contain no function as it is part of design and above code is part of big function

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are adamant that this function should NOT be a part of base, you have but 2 options to do it.

Either use a pointer to derived class

derived* pDerived = new dervied();
pDerived->myFunc();

Or (uglier & vehemently discouraged) static_cast the pointer up to derived class type and then call the function
NOTE: To be used with caution. Only use when you are SURE of the type of the pointer you are casting, i.e. you are sure that pbase is a derived or a type derived from derived. In this particular case its ok, but im guessing this is only an example of the actual code.

base* pbase = new dervied();
static_cast<derived*>(pbase)->myFunc();
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The static_cast is pretty unsafe here. It could easily lead to all kinds of trouble. –  juanchopanza Nov 19 '12 at 9:26
    
The static_cast would not return a null pointer in some cases where the dynamic_cast would. For example, it would allow to cast from a derived2 object to a derived one, even of they are not in the same inheritance branch. –  juanchopanza Nov 19 '12 at 9:58
    
yes.. correct.. static.. my bad, have changed the note. –  Karthik T Nov 19 '12 at 10:00
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myfunc needs to be accessible from the base class, so you would have to declare a public virtual myfunc in base. You could make it pure virtual if you intend for base to be an abstract base class, i.e one that cannot be instantiated and acts as an interface:

class base
{
 public:
  virtual void myfunc() = 0; // pure virtual method
};

If you ant to be able to instantiate base objects then you would have to provide an implementation for myfunc:

class base
{
 public:
  virtual void myfunc() {}; // virtual method with empty implementation 
};

There is no other clean way to do this if you want to access the function from a pointer to a base class. The safetest option is to use a dynamic_cast

base* pbase = new derived;

....
derived* pderived = dynamic_cast<derived*>(pbase);
if (derived) {
  // do something
} else {
  // error
}
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Shouldn't myfunc() be a public member? –  MWid Nov 19 '12 at 9:15
    
@MWid of course, edited. –  juanchopanza Nov 19 '12 at 9:16
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To use the base class pointer, you must change the base class definition to be:

class base
{
public:
    virtual void myFunc() { }
};

I see no other way around it. Sorry.

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You could add it as a member of base and make it a virtual or pure virtual function. If using this route however, you should also add a virtual destructor in the base class to allow successful destruction of inherited objects.

class base
{
public:
   virtual ~base(){};
   virtual void myFunc() = 0;
};

class derived : public base
{
  public:
   derived() {}
   void myFunc() { cout << "My derived function" << std::endl; }

};
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Making it protected would make it impossible to call the method from a base*. –  juanchopanza Nov 19 '12 at 9:12
    
Of course, edited –  const_ref Nov 19 '12 at 9:15
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