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Ok I should know the answer to this but for some reason I have never really understood or had the need to really get to know JavaScript.

My question is: Looking at the code samples below am I correct in my understanding or am I missing some information.


Sample 1

Need to instantiate the function (or class) in order to use the IsOld method, and a separate copy of the IsOld function will be created for each instance.

function MyClass1() {
    this.IsOld = function (age) {
        if (age > 40) {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    };
}

// sample usage
var m1 = new MyClass1();
console.log(m1.IsOld(34));

Sample 2

Need to instantiate but unlike MyClass1 the scripting engine will not need to create a copy of the method IsOld for each class instance.

var MyClass2 = (function () {
    function MyClass2() { }

    MyClass2.prototype.IsOld = function (age) {
        if (age > 40) {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    };

    return MyClass2;
})();

// sample usage
var m2 = new MyClass2();
console.log(m2.IsOld(34));

Sample 3

No need to instantiate the function / class to access the IsOld method. A single instance of the IsOld method is used across all invocations.

var MyClass3 = {
    IsOld: function (age) {
        if (age > 40) {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    },
};

// sample uage
console.log(MyClass3.IsOld(34));

Note: I am guessing there are plenty of similar question / answers here on SO but for some reason I could not find one that actually made sense to me.

share|improve this question
1  
Your understanding is correct, although the second example is unnecessarily complex with the immediate function expression IMO. – Felix Kling Nov 19 '12 at 10:00
    
@FelixKling: Actually this is how CoffeeScript compiles its classes: coffeescript.org/#try:class%20Auto – Amberlamps Nov 19 '12 at 10:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your understandings seems to be correct.

If by "need to instantiate" you mean use of 'new' keyword, I'd like to add something here.

In JavaScript use of new keyword is not the only way to create new instances. (Edited as per comments) And any function can act as a constructor function.

When you use 'new' keyword followed by any function (say 'x') what it does is

  1. Create new object (say 'y'), and set the function x's prototype as the new objects (y's) prototype.
  2. Call the function 'x' in the newly created objects y's context, i.e this would refer to this new object 'y' inside the function 'x'
  3. If the function does not return an object, return the new object 'x' created by the new operator as the result of the new expression.

Here is a good source for you to learn JavaScript by Douglas Crockford (http://javascript.crockford.com/)

So, if you are concerned about the memory (you should be), use a constructor function, and add all the common methods to functions prototype like you have done in Sample 2.

Then all those methods will be inherited to all the objects created using this function as the constructor. However, as mentioned before I think Sample 2 can be simpler:

var MyClass2 = function MyClass2() { };

MyClass2.prototype.IsOld = function (age) {
    if (age > 40) {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
};

var obj = new MyClass2();
share|improve this answer
1  
The new keyword isn't optional for the cases where it was used here. – nnnnnn Nov 19 '12 at 10:19
    
Yes, I agree, as these functions are not creating objects inside them. What I meant to say was use of 'new' is not mandatory in order to create new objects. – BuddhiP Nov 19 '12 at 10:27

As far as I know, you're right in all 3 cases.

  1. Does need instantiate IsOld and for every instance there will be new function created.
  2. Doesn't need instantiate IsOld as it is in prototype.
  3. Doesn't need instantiate IsOld as MyClass3 is already an instance (an object not a function).
share|improve this answer

It seems to me there's been some misunderstanding regarding to the structure of the class and the dynamic nature of Javascript: for all the presented cases, every instance of the "class" creates a new unnamed function.

If you want to declare "classes" in a more traditional way (like C++ or Java), you'd better:

1) Define the functions:

function MyClass_IsOld(age) {
    return (age > 40);
} 

2) Create the "class" and define its prototype:

function MyClass() { /* put any instance constructor logic here */ };
MyClass.prototype.IsOld = MyClass_IsOld;

3) Use the class:

var myInstance = new MyClass();
console.log(myInstance.IsOld(37));

If you want to use the "method" as a regular function, declare it globally, like:

function MyClass_IsOld(age) {
    return (age > 40);
} 
function MyClass() { /* put any instance constructor logic here */ };
MyClass.prototype.IsOld = MyClass_IsOld;

var myInstance = new MyClass();
console.log(myInstance.IsOld(37));        // use as a method
console.log(MyClass_IsOld(37));           // use as a function

If you want to hide the implementation details, create a closure:

var MyClass = (function () {
    function _MyClass_IsOld(age) {
        return (age > 40);
    } 
    function _MyClass() { /* put any instance constructor logic here */ };
    _MyClass.prototype.IsOld = _MyClass_IsOld;  // use as a method

    return _MyClass;
})();

var myInstance = new MyClass();
console.log(myInstance.IsOld(37));        // use as a method
console.log(MyClass_IsOld(37));           // ERROR: undefined function
share|improve this answer
    
"in the second example, by the way, the prototype is overwritten for each instance created." - No it isn't, it's created once within the immediately invoked function expression that returns the MyClass2() constructor. Have another look... – nnnnnn Nov 19 '12 at 23:05
    
Yes, you were right, @nnnnnn, I had overlooked the class constructor and confused myself with the instances constructor. This is, by the way, how I use to implement classes on Javascript. Thank you for the "heads up". – Gerardo Lima Nov 20 '12 at 16:40

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