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I'm having some difficulties sorting a simple array that looks like this:

Array
(
    [3] => Array
        (
            [0] => EU West (Ireland)
            [1] => eu-west-1
        )

    [7] => Array
        (
            [0] => South America (Sao paulo)
            [1] => sa-east-1
        )

    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => US East (Virginia)
            [1] => us-east-1
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [0] => Asia Pasific (Tokyo)
            [1] => ap-northeast-1
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => US West (Oregon)
            [1] => us-west-2
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => US West (N. California)
            [1] => us-west-1
        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [0] => Asia Pasific (Singapore)
            [1] => ap-southeast-1
        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [0] => Asia Pasific (Sydney)
            [1] => ap-southeast-2
        )

)

I want to sort this array on Index. I used ksort() but it doesn't work, it leaves an output 1.

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3 Answers 3

ksort() doesn't return the sorted array, but rather it sorts the array in place. After calling ksort($array), the contents of $array will be sorted. The function returns whether the sort was successful or not.

Example:

$array = array(1 => 1, 20 => 1, 5 => 1);

echo "Before ksort():\n";
print_r($array);

if (ksort($array)) {
    echo "ksort() completed successfully.\n";
}

echo "After ksort():\n";
print_r($array);

The above prints:

Before ksort():
Array
(
    [1] => 1
    [20] => 1
    [5] => 1
)
ksort() completed successfully.
After ksort():
Array
(
    [1] => 1
    [5] => 1
    [20] => 1
)

You shouldn't check the return value of ksort() though, since ksort() can only fail in situations in which it doesn't even get to return a failure. Therefore, the function will either return true or the script will die, in which case the return value is irrelevant (it will always be true).

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Sort uses pass-by-reference for the array, and the return value is a boolean success or failure. I assume you're doing

$myArray = ksort($myArray);

change to

$sorted = ksort($myArray);
if (!$sorted) {
    echo 'Failed to sort';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you shrink this down to if(!ksort($myArray)) { //failed } ? –  Jimbo Nov 19 '12 at 10:19
    
Most people don't even bother testing the return status at all, I only included it here to demonstrate that the returned value is a success/failure status –  Mark Baker Nov 19 '12 at 10:23
    
Indeed, also, there's not much you can do if it fails, and the reasons for it failing could be quite obscure... In practice, it really doesn't fail unless some catastrophic problem occurrs, in which case ksort() failing will be the least of the problems. –  rid Nov 19 '12 at 10:26
    
(actually, looking at source code, I see that ksort() will only fail if pemalloc() fails or if the parameters to the function are incorrect, and in either case, the script should die before ksort() even gets to return) –  rid Nov 19 '12 at 10:36

Use like

ksort($array);

After that print

print_r($array);

If you have used

print_r(ksort($array));

then it will return 1 if array is sorted

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