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I need to compare the big file(2GB) contains 22 million lines with the another file. its taking more time to process it while using Tie::File.so i have done it through 'while' but problem remains. see my code below...

use strict;
use Tie::File;
# use warnings;
my @arr;
# tie @arr, 'Tie::File', 'title_Nov19.txt';

# open(IT,"<title_Nov19.txt");                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
# my @arr=<IT>;
# close(IT);
open(RE,">>res.txt");

open(IN,"<input.txt");

while(my $data=<IN>){
    chomp($data);
    print"$data\n";
    my $occ=0;

    open(IT,"<title_Nov19.txt");    
    while(my $line2=<IT>){

        my $line=$line2;
        chomp($line);

        if($line=~m/\b$data\b/is){

            $occ++;

        }

    }
print RE"$data\t$occ\n";
}


close(IT);
close(IN);
close(RE);

so help me to reduce it...

share|improve this question
    
So you have problem X (comparing big files), then you try to solve it with Y (Tie::File) and it needs "more time"? More than what? Then you solve it with Z (no Tie::File) and the problem remains? It still needs "more time"? More than what? What's the actual problem? I'm confused. :( –  memowe Nov 19 '12 at 10:58
1  
if you are on linux/unix maybe you can do this without perl: diff file1 file2 > result.txt, if you want side-by-side comparison you can do sdiff file1 file2 > result.txt, or alternatively diff -y file1 file2 > result.txt –  knb Nov 19 '12 at 11:11
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3 Answers

Lots of things wrong with this.

Asides from the usual (lack of use strict, use warnigns, use of 2-argument open(), not checking open() result, use of global filehandles), the specific problem in your case is that you are opening/reading/closing the second file once for every single line of the first. This is going to be very slow.

I suggest you open the file title_Nov19.txt once, read all the lines into an array or hash or something, then close it; and then you can open the first file, input.txt and walk along that once, comparing to things in the array so you don't have to reopen that second file all the time.

Futher I suggest you read some basic articles on style/etc.. as your question is likely to gain more attention if it's actually written in vaguely modern standards.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your immediate reply... "I suggest you open the file title_Nov19.txt once, read all the lines into an array or hash or something, then close it; and then you can open the first file, input.txt and walk along that once, comparing to things in the array so you don't have to reopen that second file all the time." i already tried this, you can see that its commented on my code. still tat is a problem –  Akr Nov 19 '12 at 11:02
1  
+1 for suggestion of caching that file. Now let's hope it's not as big as "the big file". ;) –  memowe Nov 19 '12 at 11:05
    
@Arun still what is a problem? –  memowe Nov 19 '12 at 11:06
    
I will explain it. The file 'input' contains more than 2000 lines of names and the 'title_nov19' contains titles of 2 mln lines. i want to run each name on top of the title file to get the occurrence count. now its taking 7 sec for each name to get the count. it should be reduced. thank you.... –  Akr Nov 19 '12 at 11:13
1  
Oh, so title_Nov19.txt is the big file and input.txt is relative small? I thought it was the other way round and I'm pretty sure @LeoNerd thought that, too. You shouldn't cache the contents of the big file in an array. –  memowe Nov 19 '12 at 11:26
show 3 more comments

I tried to build a small example script with a better structure but I have to say, man, your problem description is really very unclear. It's important to not read the whole comparison file each time as @LeoNerd explained in his answer. Then I use a hash to keep track of the match count:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# cache all lines of the comparison file
open my $comp_file, '<', 'input.txt' or die "input.txt: $!\n";
chomp (my @comparison = <$comp_file>);
close $comp_file;

# prepare comparison
open my $input,  '<', 'title_Nov19.txt' or die "title_Nov19.txt: $!\n";
my %count = ();

# compare each line
while (my $title = <$input>) {
    chomp $title;

    # iterate comparison strings
    foreach my $comp (@comparison) {
        $count{$comp}++ if $title =~ /\b$comp\b/i;
    }
}

# done
close $input;

# output (sorted by count)
open my $output, '>>', 'res.txt' or die "res.txt: $!\n";
foreach my $comp (@comparison) {
    print $output "$comp\t$count{$comp}\n";
}
close $output;

Just to get you started... If someone wants to further work on this: these were my test files:

title_Nov19.txt

This is the foo title
Wow, we have bar too
Nothing special here but foo
OMG, the last title! And Foo again!

input.txt

foo
bar

And the result of the program was written to res.txt:

foo 3
bar 1
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Thank you very much.... –  Akr Nov 19 '12 at 13:53
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Here's another option using memowe's (thank you) data:

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Slurp qw/read_file write_file/;

my %count;
my $regex = join '|', map { chomp; $_ = "\Q$_\E" } read_file 'input.txt';

for ( read_file 'title_Nov19.txt' ) {
    my %seen;
    !$seen{ lc $1 }++ and $count{ lc $1 }++ while /\b($regex)\b/ig;
}

write_file 'res.txt', map "$_\t$count{$_}\n",
  sort { $count{$b} <=> $count{$a} } keys %count;

Numerically-sorted output to res.txt:

foo 3
bar 1

An alternation regex which quotes meta characters (\Q$_\E) is built and used, so only one pass against the large file's lines is needed. The hash %seen is used to insure that the input words are only counted once per line.

Hope this helps!

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