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I am using the following tutorial to learn how to shuffle in PHP, but the output is ugly. How do I change the output of the shuffle to be more in line with the poll I want to display in list format?

I am using the following tutorial to learn how to do this:

http://www.w3schools.com/php/func_array_shuffle.asp

<?php
$my_array = array("a" => "Dog", "b" => "Cat", "c" => "Horse");

shuffle($my_array);
print_r($my_array);
?

But the output is ugly: Array ( [0] => Cat [1] => Dog [2] => Horse )

How do I make the shuffle array look nice an pretty like this?

<ul>
<li><input id="pollRadioButton1" name="pollAnswerID" type="radio" value="1" /> Answer1 for Poll1</li>
<li class="pollChart pollChart1">&nbsp;</li>
<li><input id="pollRadioButton2" name="pollAnswerID" type="radio" value="2" /> Answer2 for Poll1</li>
<li class="pollChart pollChart2">&nbsp;</li>
</ul>
share|improve this question
1  
print_r is only a quick debugging technique. If you want actual pretty output, loop through the array and print the HTML you need. –  deceze Nov 19 '12 at 11:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
<?php

    $my_array = array("a" => "Dog", "b" => "Cat", "c" => "Horse");
    shuffle($my_array);

?>
<ul>
    <?php foreach ($my_array as $key => $element): ?>
        <li>
            Whatever you want to do with
            <?php echo htmlspecialchars($element) ?>
            (<?php echo htmlspecialchars($key) ?>).
        </li>
        <li class="pollChart pollChart1">&nbsp;</li>
    <?php endforeach ?>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
You might consider including the lines initializing the array and shuffling it in your example to make it clearer for the OP. –  Botond Balázs Nov 19 '12 at 11:27
    
@BotondBalázs, good idea, thanks. –  rid Nov 19 '12 at 11:28

print_r() is just mentioned for debugging only.

To get a 'clean' output you have to specify how things should be ouput:

<?php
$my_array = array("a" => "Dog", "b" => "Cat", "c" => "Horse");

shuffle($my_array);

foreach ($my_array as $key=>$val)
    echo sprintf('%s: %s<br>'."\n",$key,$val);
?>

In your case the output might be something like:

echo sprintf('<li><input id="pollRadioButton[]" name="%1$s" '.
             'type="radio" value="%2$s" />%2$s</li>'."\n".
             '<li class="pollChart pollChart1">&nbsp;</li>'."\n",$key,$val);
share|improve this answer
2  
print_r() is most definitely not for serialization and writing HTML in PHP string literals (then echo-ing them) is against what PHP was made for. Also, strings that are appended to HTML should be properly HTML escaped. –  rid Nov 19 '12 at 11:28
2  
Using sprintf to print HTML is wrong on so many levels... –  Botond Balázs Nov 19 '12 at 11:28
    
@rid: BotondBalázs: php was originally created as html embedded control language. This is where the typical php sequences inside html markup originate from. However php has come a long way. And it is nowadays used for much more complex scenarios. I learned in big projects that the readability of embedded php code is often that bad, that it makes much more sense to cleanly output html markup. Especially if you have many switches between static html and dynamic php control structures you are more or less guaranteed to create invalid html. What is the point is sticking to an outdated paradigm? –  arkascha Nov 19 '12 at 11:36
1  
It's not an outdated paradigm... I agree, PHP is used as a general purpose language, but it's also a templating language which can transform a string of unreadable unformatted HTML into nicely formatted HTML with PHP embedded. But then again, this is a matter of style. The other two points I'm trying to make though are not a matter of style and I think they should be taken into consideration for any production code: do not use print_r() for serialization and always escape strings. –  rid Nov 19 '12 at 11:42
1  
@arkascha: I have to respectfully disagree. sprintfing HTML string literals is by no means more maintainable (no indentation, hard to follow which parameter goes where, therefore more error-prone, etc). Though embedding PHP inside HTML using <?php ... ?> may very well lead to unreadable code, at least it allows for easy indentation, for example. Though the best option for long-term maintainability is to use the MVC paradigm and HTML templates. –  Botond Balázs Nov 19 '12 at 11:43

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