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How can I find an IP address is pingable or not? Also how can I find the pingable IP is static or dynamic using perl script?

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I'd recommend asking your question on Google. –  lanzz Nov 19 '12 at 11:32
    
You can only detect if something uses DHCP if you have direct access to the DHCP server, or you sniff for dhcp packets. Can you do either one? If so, which one? –  Mike Pennington Nov 19 '12 at 11:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How can I find an IP address is pingable or not?

[mpenning@tsunami ~]$ perl -e '$retval=system("ping -c 2 172.16.1.1");if ($retval==0) {print "It pings";} else { print "ping failed"; }'
PING 172.16.1.1 (172.16.1.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 172.16.1.1: icmp_req=1 ttl=255 time=0.384 ms
64 bytes from 172.16.1.1: icmp_req=2 ttl=255 time=0.416 ms

--- 172.16.1.1 ping statistics ---
2 packets transmitted, 2 received, 0% packet loss, time 999ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.384/0.400/0.416/0.016 ms
It pings[mpenning@tsunami ~]$

In more friendly form...

$retval=system("ping -c 2 172.16.1.1");
if ($retval==0) {
    print "It pings\n";
} else {
    print "ping failed\n";
}

Also how can I find the pingable IP is static or dynamic using perl script?

You can only do this if you have direct access to the DHCP server, or you can sniff the subnet and look for DHCP packets. We can't answer this yet without more information.

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Thanks Mike.... –  Madhankumar Nov 19 '12 at 12:06

Have a look at the Net::Ping module;

#!/usr/bin/env perl
#
use strict;
use warnings;

use Net::Ping;

my $ip_address = shift || die "Need an IP address (or hostname).\n";

my $p = Net::Ping->new();
if ( $p->ping($ip_address) ) {
    print "Success!\n";
}
else {
    print "Fail!\n";
}

Finding out if an IP address is dynamic or static requires a bit more work. Take a look at this and this post.

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Something like this might help to check if the host is responding to ICMP or not:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Net::Ping;

my (@alive_hosts, @dead_hosts);

my $ping = Net::Ping->new;

while (my $host = <DATA>) {
        next if $host =~ /^\s*$/;
        chomp $host;
        if ($ping->ping($host)) {
                push @alive_hosts, $host;
        } else {
                push @dead_hosts, $host;
        }
}

if (@alive_hosts) {
        print "Alive hosts\n" . "-" x 10 . "\n";
        print join ("\n", sort @alive_hosts) . "\n\n"
}

if (@dead_hosts) {
        print "Dead hosts\n" . "-" x 10 . "\n";
        print join ("\n", sort @dead_hosts) . "\n\n";
}

__DATA__
server1
server2
server3

The result would be something like:

Alive hosts
----------
server1
server2

Dead hosts
----------
server3

I'm not sure about your second requirement.

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