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What is the difference between executeAsyncScript and executeScript? How can i use event such as window.onload? I tried something like this

((JavascriptExecutor) driver).executeAsyncScript("window.onload = function() {alert('Hello')}"); 

But of course it did not work... So if anyone knows how it works please write an example

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1  
The main difference between those are that scripts executed with async must explicitly signal they are finished by invoking the provided callback. This callback is always injected into the executed function as the last argument. –  sphair Nov 19 '12 at 11:45
    
Thanks you for your feedback! –  vispart Nov 20 '12 at 11:58
    
@sphair you should have submitted an answer, its concise and correct, sifting through some of the garbage below was hard. –  Pykler May 28 at 22:29
    
Ok, just did :) –  sphair May 30 at 7:57

4 Answers 4

i use executeScript. example provided:

String cssSelector="...blablabla...";
 JavascriptExecutor js = (JavascriptExecutor) driver;
        StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        stringBuilder.append("document.getElementById(\'"+cssSelector +"\').click();");
        js.executeScript(stringBuilder.toString());

Concerning details on alerts there is known issue. you can get details here

In accordance with documentataion difference is:

executeScript

public java.lang.Object executeScript(java.lang.String script,
                             java.lang.Object... args)

Description copied from interface: JavascriptExecutor Executes JavaScript in the context of the currently selected frame or window. The script fragment provided will be executed as the body of an anonymous function. Within the script, use document to refer to the current document. Note that local variables will not be available once the script has finished executing, though global variables will persist. If the script has a return value (i.e. if the script contains a return statement), then the following steps will be taken:

  • For an HTML element, this method returns a WebElement
  • For a decimal, a Double is returned
  • For a non-decimal number, a Long is returned
  • For a boolean, a Boolean is returned
  • For all other cases, a String is returned.
  • For an array, return a List with each object following the rules above. We support nested lists.
  • Unless the value is null or there is no return value, in which null is returned

Arguments must be a number, a boolean, a String, WebElement, or a List of any combination of the above. An exception will be thrown if the arguments do not meet these criteria. The arguments will be made available to the JavaScript via the "arguments" magic variable, as if the function were called via "Function.apply"

Specified by: executeScript in interface JavascriptExecutor Parameters: script - The JavaScript to execute args - The arguments to the script. May be empty Returns: One of Boolean, Long, String, List or WebElement. Or null.

executeAsyncScript

public java.lang.Object executeAsyncScript(java.lang.String script,
                                  java.lang.Object... args)

Description copied from interface: JavascriptExecutor Execute an asynchronous piece of JavaScript in the context of the currently selected frame or window. Unlike executing synchronous JavaScript, scripts executed with this method must explicitly signal they are finished by invoking the provided callback. This callback is always injected into the executed function as the last argument. The first argument passed to the callback function will be used as the script's result. This value will be handled in the same way as the synchronous case.

Example #1: Performing a sleep in the browser under test.

 long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
   ((JavascriptExecutor) driver).executeAsyncScript(
       "window.setTimeout(arguments[arguments.length - 1], 500);");
   System.out.println(
       "Elapsed time: " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - start));

Example #2: Synchronizing a test with an AJAX application:

 WebElement composeButton = driver.findElement(By.id("compose-button"));
   composeButton.click();
   ((JavascriptExecutor) driver).executeAsyncScript(
       "var callback = arguments[arguments.length - 1];" +
       "mailClient.getComposeWindowWidget().onload(callback);");
   driver.switchTo().frame("composeWidget");
   driver.findElement(By.id("to")).sendKeys("bog@example.com");

Example #3: Injecting a XMLHttpRequest and waiting for the result:

 Object response = ((JavascriptExecutor) driver).executeAsyncScript(
       "var callback = arguments[arguments.length - 1];" +
       "var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();" +
       "xhr.open('GET', '/resource/data.json', true);" +
       "xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {" +
       "  if (xhr.readyState == 4) {" +
       "    callback(xhr.responseText);" +
       "  }" +
       "}" +
       "xhr.send();");
   JSONObject json = new JSONObject((String) response);
   assertEquals("cheese", json.getString("food"));

Script arguments must be a number, a boolean, a String, WebElement, or a List of any combination of the above. An exception will be thrown if the arguments do not meet these criteria. The arguments will be made available to the JavaScript via the "arguments" variable.

Specified by: executeAsyncScript in interface JavascriptExecutor Parameters: script - The JavaScript to execute. args - The arguments to the script. May be empty. Returns: One of Boolean, Long, String, List, WebElement, or null.

Detailed documentaion is here

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1  
The "description" above (copied from the interface documentation) AND the documentation linked to are out of date. A list of "objects" will be returned as a List<Map<String,Object>>. Where, each key is a property of the object. I don't know how to get any details of this, but I just got burned after reading this so I thought I'd contribute. –  dmansfield May 6 at 21:10

In simple terms

executeAsyncScript -> This method doesn't block the execution of next line of code...till execution of this method is completed. This method will execute as well as next line of code will be executed...asynchronously. (without blocking each other)

executeScript -> This method will block the execution till it's execution is completed and then it moves to next line of code. In short your automation code will halt till the Javascript is executed via this method.

Here is a small piece of example...which you can try...Though it's written in C# (please modify for Java Compatibility)

        IWebDriver driver= new InternetExplorerDriver();
        driver.Navigate().GoToUrl("http://www.google.com");
        IJavaScriptExecutor js = (IJavaScriptExecutor) driver;
        Console.WriteLine("Entering the Async Call");
        driver.Manage().Timeouts().SetScriptTimeout(new TimeSpan(0,0,4));
        js.ExecuteAsyncScript("setInterval(function(){ alert('Hello');},3000); callback();");
        Console.WriteLine("Exiting the Async Call");

        Console.WriteLine("Entering the Sync Call");
        Console.WriteLine(js.ExecuteScript("return document.title"));
        Console.WriteLine("Exiting the Sync Call");
        Console.ReadLine();

        driver.Close();
        driver.Quit();

By running the above example , you will find that Javascript code in executeAsyncScript will run after the complete automation code is executed. Hence the Alert window with "hello" text will appear at later stages of execution (when the executeScript is executed)

But where as the code in executeScript will run by blocking the following line of code.

Console.WriteLine("Exiting the Sync Call");

Hence you will see output "Google" between the lines

Entering the Sync Call

Google

Exiting the Sync Call

I hope this helps..All the best :)

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+1 for clear and concise explanation –  eugene.polschikov Nov 19 '12 at 20:35
    
Thanks buddy :) –  Anuragh27crony Nov 20 '12 at 6:31
    
Thanks you for your feedback, it really helped me to understand the difference! :) –  vispart Nov 20 '12 at 11:56
2  
-1 "executeAsyncScript -> This method doesn't block the execution of next line of code" That description is misleading . executeAsyncScript doesn't return immediately, unless you tell it to as you did in your code because you didn't call the callback asynchronously. Had you called the callback from within the setTimeout() call, the next java line would not run until after the timeout. –  Juan Mendes Aug 1 '13 at 17:58
    
The description you have for executeAsyncScript is extremely wrong! its meant to allow you to work with Async Code, not for it to be Asynchronous, it is actually not asynchronous at all! –  Pykler May 28 at 22:27

Just try, ((JavascriptExecutor) driver).executeScript("alert('Hello');"); and this will show the Alert.

((JavascriptExecutor) driver).executeAsyncScript() is used when the JS takes time to execute e.g.in a Web Service call.

window.onload makes sure the JS is executed when the page is loaded completely.

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The main difference between those are that scripts executed with async must explicitly signal they are finished by invoking the provided callback. This callback is always injected into the executed function as the last argument.

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