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I have several methods that have the folling structure:

    public void doWhatever()
    {
     methodToPrepareEnvironment();
     // do something
     methodToResumeEnvironment();
    }

All my "doWhatever"-type methods call these prepare/resume methods and there is only 1 prepare and 1 resume method called by all these doWhatever methods. Is there a better way to achieve this without having to put a call to the prepare and resume methods at the beginning and end of all my doWhatever methods? I have the feeling I am missing something extremely basic here. Please note, the doWhatever methods cannot be combined, they each need to be independent and they each need to prepare the environment, do some tasks and then resume the environment.

Thank you.

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Are the "doWhatever"-type methods in the same class or in separate classes? –  Panos Rontogiannis Nov 19 '12 at 13:00
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With strategic use of access modifiers you can ensure external calls are always preceded and followed by method calls with little repetition like so:

public void DoWhatever()
{
    DoAction(DoingWhatever);
}

private void DoingWhatever()
{
    // ...
}

private void DoAction(Action action)
{
    methodToPrepareEnvironment();

    action();

    methodToResumeEnvironment();
}

An Action is a delegate that represents a method with no return value.

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Thank you. I understand this as the ability to pass "a method to be called" as an argument to another method. Simple and elegant. –  leoinlios Nov 19 '12 at 13:45
    
@leoinlios: Exactly. This is also a form of dependency inversion which is the D principle in SOLID. –  Phil Gan Nov 19 '12 at 14:57
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Is there a better way to achieve this without having to put a call to the prepare and resume methods at the beginning and end of all my doWhatever methods?

Pass in a delegate (two built in ones are Action and Func):

public void doWhatever(Action anAction )
{
 methodToPrepareEnvironment();

 anAction();

 methodToResumeEnvironment();
} 

In regards of ensuring the Prepare and Resume are always called - the above does not cater for that, as the anAction can be called by any code that has access to it.

You can investigate AOP - a popular tool is PostSharp.

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1  
This was going to be my suggestion too, but it unfortunately won't restrict people from calling "anAction" without the surrounding calls... –  sybkar Nov 19 '12 at 11:42
    
@sybkar - Can't see how that would ever be possible. If a method exists, you can't constrain it to be called in a specific manner (i.e. must call another method first or after). –  Oded Nov 19 '12 at 11:45
    
I was pretty sure that it couldn't be done, I was just mentioning it for "full disclosure" –  sybkar Nov 19 '12 at 11:51
    
Thank you for your time and help too. –  leoinlios Nov 19 '12 at 13:46
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This how I would do it , Introduce a delegate that has the signature of the function to be called between methodToPrepareEnvironment() and methodToResumeEnvironment() and then attach the funcion to the delegate and call doWhatever in this way

doWhatever(Fn); 

//////

public delegate void ToDO();
class Program
{
    public void Fn()
    {

        Console.WriteLine("This is Fn");

    }

    public void doWhatever(ToDO t)
    {
        methodToPrepareEnvironment();
        t();
        methodToResumeEnvironment();
    }
}
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Thank you. I have tested this and found that the behaviour is exactly the same as using the Action type argument, except that here I have to first declare the delegate separately. Not sure if one way is better than the other, but here I have an extra declaration to do. –  leoinlios Nov 19 '12 at 13:54
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A slightly different option (though not as "clean" as these options, and certainly not as intuitive to someone trying to maintain the code would be to mark the functions with an attribute, and then have a build step that injects method calls before and after:

[WrapWithEnvironmentCalls()]
public void MyFunction()
{
    // Code goes here
}

I believe the CTP Rosalyn has some functionality to approach this.

CAVEAT: I would never do this in my code, it wouldn't be maintainable, intuitive, and would likely get torn to shreds in a code review, but I'm just providing it as an alternate option for those more adventurous.

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