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I got to implement a chat in my application. Connection to a server is made using sockets. I should register to that server and the server will aknowledge that with a reply.

I have implemented this in a single method where I send the command using a BufferedWriter, and then start reading from the input stream until it tells me there is no more data.

I read properly the server reply. However, I never get the negative value from the second in.read call and thus my method stays blocked in the while loop (in the conditionnal statement where I make that call).

How should this be done with sockets? I usually do that with files or other input streams without problem.

If I should read only the bytes I am supposed to read, does that mean that I either have to:

  • Know in advance the length of the server response?
  • or make the server send a code to notify it has finished to send its response?

Currently I am doing the following:

private String sendSocketRequest(String request, boolean skipResponse) throws ChatException {
    if (!isConnected()) openConnection();

    try {
        BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(
                                     socket.getOutputStream()), 2048);
        out.append(request);
        out.flush();
        out = null;
    } catch (IOException e) {
        LogHelper.error("Unable to send socket request: " + request, e);
        throw new ChatException("Unable to send socket request: " + request, e);
    }

    try {
        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                                     socket.getInputStream()), 2048);
        StringBuffer response = new StringBuffer();
        char[] buffer = new char[2048];
        int charsRead = -1;

// >>>>>>>> This is where it gets blocked <<<<<<<<<

        while ((charsRead = in.read(buffer)) >= 0) {
            if (charsRead > 0) response.append(new String(buffer, 0, charsRead));
        }
        return response.toString();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        LogHelper.error("Unable to read socket response: " + request, e);
        throw new ChatException("Unable to read socket response: " + request, e);
    }
}

Connection to the server is made with the following method:

public synchronized void openConnection() throws ChatException {
    try {
        socket = new Socket(Constants.API_CHAT_SERVER_ADDRESS, Constants.API_CHAT_SERVER_PORT);
        socket.setKeepAlive(true);

        LogHelper.debug("CHAT      >> Connected to the chat server: " + Constants.API_CHAT_SERVER_ADDRESS);
    } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
        LogHelper.error("Unable to open chat connection", e);
        throw new ChatException("Unable to open chat connection", e);
    } catch (IOException e) {
        LogHelper.error("Unable to open chat connection", e);
        throw new ChatException("Unable to open chat connection", e);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Wouldn't read() block until it read 2048 bytes? EOF would only be received if ther server closed the connection, wouldn't it? – alk Nov 19 '12 at 12:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The amount of data to be sent/received over a socket based connection is protocol dependend and not known to the TCP/IP stack, but only to the application layer.

The protocol used is developer dependend ... ;-) so coming to your questions:

If I should read only the bytes I am supposed to read, does that mean that I either have to:

  • Know in advance the length of the server response?

Yes, this is one possibility.

  • or make the server send a code to notify it has finished to send its response?

Also yes, as this is another possibility. Common markers are \n or \r\n. The NUL/'\0' character also might make sense.

A third option is to prefix each data chunk with a constant number of bytes describing the amount of bytes to come.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, that confirms what I thought. By the way, I can't touch the server code so I'll have to do some more thinking :'( – Vincent Mimoun-Prat Nov 20 '12 at 7:16

Instead of dealing with bytes, maybe it's simpler handling instances of ad-hoc classes, like - for instance - a Message class:

The server:

// Streams
protected ObjectInputStream fromBuffer = null;
protected ObjectOutputStream toBuffer = null;

// Listening for a new connection
ServerSocket serverConn = new ServerSocket(TCP_PORT);
socket = serverConn.accept();
toBuffer = new ObjectOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());
fromBuffer = new ObjectInputStream(socket.getInputStream());

// Receiving a new Message object
Message data = (Message)fromBuffer.readObject();

The client then sends a message by simply:

// Sending a message
Message data = new Message("Hello");
toBuffer.writeObject(data);

Message can be as complex as needed as long as its members implement Serializable interface.

share|improve this answer
1  
Could be an option if I could touch the server's code. Unfortunatly I must use their badly implemented "protocol" (I would even call it a protocol) which will sometimes return a string, sometimes a json object, but never any marker to tell that's the end... – Vincent Mimoun-Prat Nov 20 '12 at 7:15

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