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I'm trying to catch and handle a specific HttpException, namely "The remote host closed the connection. The error code is 0x800704CD."

My intention is to add a Catch for the HttpException to the relevant Try block and test for the error code that is generated. Sample code:

Try
    // Do some stuff
Catch exHttp As HttpException
    If exHttp.ErrorCode.ToString() = "0x800704CD" Then DoSomething()
Catch ex As Exception
    // Generic error handling
End Try

But I can't work out how to extract the error code displayed in the exception (i.e. "0x800704CD") from the HttpException object. Converting the integer value of the ErrorCode property to hex returns "800704CD" so clearly I'm not understanding how this code is generated.

Thanks.

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in the sample code you are assigning 0x800704CD whicgh should generate another exception – Saddam Abu Ghaida Nov 19 '12 at 12:41
    
have you tried to print the stack trace and see what does it have – Saddam Abu Ghaida Nov 19 '12 at 12:42
    
exHttp.ErrorCode.ToString() returns the integer value of the error code, converted to string e.g. "-2147023667" – Alan Buchanan Nov 19 '12 at 12:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try the Below Code:

 Try
    // Do some stuff
        Catch exHttp As HttpException
            If exHttp.ErrorCode = &H800704CD Then DoSomething()
        Catch ex As Exception
    // Generic error handling
        End Try
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks RG ATHISH, adding the &H works. Could you explain why though? – Alan Buchanan Nov 19 '12 at 15:31
1  
0x800704CD for C#.net , &H800704CD for vb.net – RGA Nov 20 '12 at 9:02

ErrorCode property is an integer so just test for integer value, no reason to convert to hexadecimal or string.

0x in most programming languages means the following characters denote a hexadecimal number, i.e. 0x800704CD means 800704CD will be interpreted as a hexadecimal number. For VB use &H.

More on VB.Net literals:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s9cz43ek.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dzy06xhf.aspx

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