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How can I access a package variable from a function in the same package?

The following code only changes x locally to the function. How can I change myPackage::x from that function?

Example:

x <- list()
populate_list <- function() {
    x["a"] <- 4
}

--

Here is the full code I'm using to test this with get. The cache key is simply chosen to be different every time the package is run. This is the package code, in R/get_obj.R

cache <- list()
test_cache <- function(){
    cache <- get("cache")
    cache[[paste(sample.int(10),collapse="-")]] <- 1
    return(cache)
}

I test it in R with:

> library(devtools)
> load_all("mypackage")
Loading mypackage
> mypackage::test_cache()
$`4-1-6-5-9-3-10-2-7-8`
[1] 1

> mypackage::test_cache()
$`6-9-7-10-5-1-4-2-3-8`
[1] 1

> mypackage::cache
list()

For mypackage::cache and the second run of mypackage::test_cache(), I expected this list as output:

$`4-1-6-5-9-3-10-2-7-8`
[1] 1

$`6-9-7-10-5-1-4-2-3-8`
[1] 1
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Try making cache an environment - you're running into R's default copy-on-modify behaviour. –  hadley Nov 19 '12 at 13:55
    
You are also defining a local variable called cache inside of the test_cache function. What happens if you remove the line cache <-get("cache") but leave the rest the same? You may still need to use an environment for cache since the change inside of the method will cause the value to be copied as suggested above. –  Rob Gevers Nov 19 '12 at 14:53
    
@RobGevers Similar to what's in the first example? Then the variable is not modified in the "package" scope. –  Andreas Nov 19 '12 at 14:54
    
It seems like you are mixing the package scope and the function scope. If the cache line is outside of the scope of the package and you want to create the variable and then have those functions use it you will need to pass an environment around as suggested by @Hadley and then use the get methods I pointed you to in my answer to tell it that the environment is the one you want the variable to be scoped in. –  Rob Gevers Nov 19 '12 at 15:13
    
@RobGevers Sorry, I'm new to environments and don't quite understand. Yes, I want to access the package scope from the function scope. A static for only that function would also work. If I created an environment with cache and passed that environment around, couldn't I just as well pass `cache' around from the start? –  Andreas Nov 19 '12 at 15:24
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2 Answers

Take a look at the get method. It allows you to pull variables directly from specific environments rather than relying on the lexical scoping of the current method.

The documentation for environments should help make this argument for get more clear though it is difficult to identify the exact syntax without knowing the scenario.

In general it is not a good idea to hide variables by defining them at a local scope if you know you will want to access them more globally.

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Which environment should I supply? x <- get("x") doesn't throw an error but doesn't seem to find the right variable, either. –  Andreas Nov 19 '12 at 13:05
    
I don't understand what you mean about defining variables at a local scope. How do you suggest I solve the problem instead? I need a "package global" that can be modified from a function in the package. The variable is used to cache some expensive operations done in the function. –  Andreas Nov 19 '12 at 13:14
    
If you are working on this problem as the package writer, you should be able to define the function and use it anywhere you need to as long as you do not define something else using the same variable name. Can you update your question with a more thorough example of what you are trying to do? –  Rob Gevers Nov 19 '12 at 13:39
    
I've updated the question with a more thorough example of what happens and what I want to happen. –  Andreas Nov 19 '12 at 13:50
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The <<- operator searches the parent environments for an existing definition, so the following gives me what I wanted:

x <- list()
populate_list <- function() {
    x["a"] <<- 4
}

Or for the other example:

cache <- list()
test_cache <- function(){
    cache[[paste(sample.int(10),collapse="-")]] <<- 1
    return(cache)
}
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