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This should be very simple, but my efforts with unlist or matrix failed.

How can you export the following list into an excel sheet that preserves the same structure?

list(structure(list(rob = c(0.500395231401348, 0.839314035292317, 
0.710466394967634, 0.61574235723249)), .Names = "rob", row.names = c(NA, 
4L), class = "data.frame"), structure(list(rob = c(0.66163340478379, 
0.591092739290417, 0.554484883310407, 0.78199375944331, 0.489388775242085
)), .Names = "rob", row.names = c(NA, 5L), class = "data.frame"), 
    structure(list(rob = c(0.697897964659196, 0.480394119894312, 
    0.514294379103359, 0.626971885076273, 0.77938643423231, 0.618135503224601
    )), .Names = "rob", row.names = c(NA, 6L), class = "data.frame"))

Thanks!

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1  
Your object is a list of one-column data.frames, Excel sheets are tables. How do you want the output look like? Each data.frame of your list in one column of the resulting sheet? –  Beasterfield Nov 19 '12 at 12:56
    
Do I see correctly that the number of rows are different? What to include in the export for nonexisting elements? –  rlegendi Nov 19 '12 at 12:56
    
I think it's enough if the output in excel looks like the output in R, i.e. 3 vectors after each other. –  Rico Nov 19 '12 at 13:29
    
@Rico then use Andrie's answer and make the export via XLConnect: stackoverflow.com/questions/11222027/… –  Beasterfield Nov 19 '12 at 16:00
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do it by:

  1. Padding each vector with NA to make all vectors the same length
  2. Using do.call(rbind, ...) to create a data frame

Like this:

xx <- lapply(x, unlist)
max <- max(sapply(xx, length))
do.call(rbind, lapply(xx, function(z)c(z, rep(NA, max-length(z)))))

          rob1      rob2      rob3      rob4                    
[1,] 0.5003952 0.8393140 0.7104664 0.6157424        NA        NA
[2,] 0.6616334 0.5910927 0.5544849 0.7819938 0.4893888        NA
[3,] 0.6978980 0.4803941 0.5142944 0.6269719 0.7793864 0.6181355

Then it's a simple mattter of using write.table() or your favourite export to excel method.

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