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Started by trying to write a small program to translate basic arithmetic into English, I end up building a binary tree(which is inevitably very unbalanced) to represent the order of evaluations. First, I wrote

struct expr;

    typedef struct{
    unsigned char entity_flag;  /*positive when the oprd
    struct represents an entity 
     ---a single digit or a parenthesized block*/                      
    char oprt;

    expr * l_oprd;// these two point to the children nodes 
    expr * r_oprd;
    } expr;

However, to efficiently represent single digits, I prefer

typedef struct{
 unsigned char entity_flag;
 int ival;
} digit;

Since now the "oprd" feild of each "expr" struct may be either of the above struct-s, I now shall modify their types to

void * l_oprd;
void * r_oprd;

Then there comes the "central question": how can you access members through a void pointer? please see the follow code

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>


typedef struct {
int i1;
int i2;} s;
main(){
void* p=malloc(sizeof(s));

//p->i1=1;
//p->i2=2;

*(int*)p=1;
*((int *)p+1)=2;
printf("s{i1:%d, i2: %d}\n",*(int*)p,*((int *)p+1));
}

The compiler wouldn't accept the commented version! Do I have to do it with the cluttered approach above?

please help.

PS: as you have noticed ,each struct-s above possess a field of the name "entity_flag", thus

void * vp;
...(giving some value to vp)
unsigned char flag=vp->entity_flag;

may extract the flag regardless of what void points to, is this allowed in C? or even "safe" in C?

share|improve this question
    
struct s doesn't have any entity_flag –  mux Nov 19 '12 at 13:15
    
@mux:That struct "s" is meant to be used to experiment with void pointers pointing to structs in a separate .c file; not part of the project wherein entity_flag is relevant, hope this is not the reason for the down vote –  EthOmus Nov 19 '12 at 13:28
    
I didn't down vote, but your question isn't specific. –  mux Nov 19 '12 at 13:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't access members through void * pointers. There are ways you could cast it (indeed, you don't even need to state the case explicitly with void *), but even that is the wrong answer.

The correct answer is to use union:

typedef union {
  struct{
    unsigned char entity_flag;  /*positive when the oprd
    struct represents an entity 
     ---a single digit or a parenthesized block*/                      
    char oprt;

    expr * l_oprd;// these two point to the children nodes 
    expr * r_oprd;
  } expr;
  struct{
    unsigned char entity_flag;
    int ival;
  } digit;
} expr;

You then access an expression like this (given a variable expr *e):

e->expr->entity_flag;

And a digit like this:

e->digit->entity_flag;

Any other solution is a nasty hack, IMO, and most of the casting solutions will risk breaking the "strict aliasing" rules that say that the compiler is allowed to assume that two pointers of different types can't reference the same memory.


Edit ...

If you need to be able to inspect the data itself in order to figure out which member of the union is in use, you can.

Basically, If the top-most fields in two structs are declared the same then they will have the same binary representation. This isn't just limited to unions, this is true in general across all binaries compiled for that architecture (if you think about it, this is essential for libraries to work).

In unions it is common to pull those out into a separate struct so that it's obvious what you're doing, although it's not required:

union {
  struct {
    int ID;
  } base;
  struct {
    int ID;
    char *data
  } A;
  struct {
    int ID;
    int *numeric_data;
  } B;
}

In this scheme, p->base.ID, p->A.ID, p->B.ID are guaranteed to read the same.

share|improve this answer
    
so sockaddr is a nasty hack :) ? –  mux Nov 19 '12 at 13:17
    
Yes, it is, but it's not dangerous because you don't write in one form and read in another, and certainly not in the same function. –  ams Nov 19 '12 at 13:20
    
sockaddr is the way it is because the union solution doesn't allow for much modularity or extensibility, which is a shame. –  ams Nov 19 '12 at 13:21
    
I wrote "digit" structure because I want to represent single digits with less space, the union solution would crash this purpose since the sizeof(expr) will be allocate when only sizeof(digit) is necessary. –  EthOmus Nov 19 '12 at 13:25
    
It's perfectly safe to allocate only enough space for the fields you plan to use. What's not safe is breaking aliasing rules. –  ams Nov 19 '12 at 13:26

Just convert p to the relevant pointer type:

s *a = p;

a->i1 = 42;
a->i2 = 31;

or

((s *) p)->i1 = 42;
((s *) p)->i2 = 31; 
share|improve this answer

you could cast it:

((s*)p)->i1=1;
((s*)p)->i2=2;

I don't see any entity_flag in struct s but if you mean expr the same applies:

unsigned char flag=((expr*)vp)->entity_flag;
share|improve this answer

If you know the offset at where your struct member is you can do pointer arithmetic and then cast to the appropriate type according to the value of entity_flag.

I would strongly suggest to align both structures in bytes and use the same number of bytes for oprt and digit.

Also, if you only have oprt and digit "types" in your tree you could sacrifice the first bit of precision to flag for digit or oprt and save the space needed for unsigned char entity_flag. If you use a single 4 bytes int var for both oprt and digit and use the first bit to encode the type you can extract a digit by (using the union solution pattern: proposed in the thread)

typedef union {
    struct {
        int code;
        expr * l_expr;
        expr * r_expr;
    } oprt;
    struct {
       int val;
    } digit;
} expr;

expr *x;
int raw_digit = x->digit.val;

int digit = raw_digit | ((0x4000000 & raw_digit) << 1 ) // preserves sign in 2's complement 

x->digit.val = digit | 0x8000000                       // assuming MSB==1 means digit

Using union does not necessarily uses more memory for digits. Basically a digit only takes 4 bytes. So every time you need to alloc a digit type expr you can simply call malloc(4), cast the results to *expr, and set the MSB to 1 accordingly. If you encode and decode expr pointers without bugs, you'll never try to reach beyond the 4th bytes of a "digit" type expr ... hopefully. I don't recommend this solution if you need safety ^_^

To check for expr types easily, you can use bitfield inside the union I believe:

typedef union {
   struct {
       int code;
       expr * l_expr;
       expr * r_expr;
   } oprt;
   struct {
       int val;
   } digit;
   struct {
       unsigned int is_digit : 1;
       int : 31; //unused
   } type;

} expr;

share|improve this answer

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