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Think of I have several XPath expressions like:

loan:_applicant/base:_entity/person:_locations/base:SmartRefOfLocationeJDvviUx[base:_entity/contact:_category/base:_underlyingValue='Personal' and base:_entity/contact:_confirmedByResident/common:_isConfirmed/base:_underlyingValue='true' and base:_entity/base:_process/base:_entity/base:_id/base:_underlyingValue = /loan:Application/base:_process/base:_entity/base:_id/base:_underlyingValue]/base:_entity/base:_id/base:_underlyingValue

I try to split these expressions using /base:_entity parts as a splitter like this:

string[] stringSeparators = new string[] { "/base:_entity" };
string[] pathTokens = xPath.Split(stringSeparators, StringSplitOptions.None);

But I need to prevent splitting when /base:_entity is between [ and ] chars.

I have to produce the following string array as output for the sample expression that I wrote above is:

"loan:_applicant"
"/person:_locations/base:SmartRefOfLocationeJDvviUx
[base:_entity/contact:_category/base:_underlyingValue='Personal' and base:_entity/contact:_confirmedByResident/common:_isConfirmed/base:_underlyingValue='true' and base:_entity/base:_process/base:_entity/base:_id/base:_underlyingValue =  /loan:Application/base:_process/base:_entity/base:_id/base:_underlyingValue]"
"/base:_id/base:_underlyingValue"

Do you have any suggestions?

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd use some cute Regex like (?<=^.*\][^\[]*|^[^\[\]]*)/base:_entity and then Regex's method Split. It uses positive look-behind to check whether the first bracket on the left is the closing bracket ']' or there is no bracket at all.

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Thanks for your answer! –  anilca Nov 19 '12 at 15:45
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