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just wondering if i dont have to care about garbage collection if i allocate structs with new.

what if they are later casted to an object?

public object Func()
{
  SMyStruct bla = new SMyStruct();

  return bla;
}
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4  
You might be interested in this article by Eric Lippert. –  Frédéric Hamidi Nov 19 '12 at 13:18
    
@FrédéricHamidi thanks, will need some time to read and understand it though. –  clamp Nov 19 '12 at 13:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It will be "boxed" and will be allocated on Heap.

Richter CLR via C#:

It's possible to convert value type to a reference type by using mechanism called boxing. Internally, here's what heppens when an instance of valuetype is boxed:

  1. Memory is allocated from the managed heap. The amount of memory allocated is the size required by the value type's fields plus the two additional overhead members (the type object pointer and the sync block index) required by all objects on the managed heap.

  2. The value type's fields are copied to the newly allocated heap memory.

  3. The address of the object is returned. This address is now a reference to an object; the value type is now a reference type.

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i'm sorry, of course Heap –  Kirill Bestemyanov Nov 19 '12 at 13:21
    
so it will first be created on the stack and then moved to the heap? –  clamp Nov 19 '12 at 13:25
    
@clamp The Truth About Value Types –  L.B Nov 19 '12 at 13:29
    
You can think of boxing as if your value type is wrapped inside a reference type. This implicitly means that a refrence type is created which contains a copy of your value type. –  Jeldrik Nov 19 '12 at 13:38
    
@clamp Yes. I update the answer with details –  Kirill Bestemyanov Nov 19 '12 at 13:43

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