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A bit confused about Ruby's initialize method.

Why does not it return my value, as other methods do?

class SomeClass

  attr_reader :val

  def initialize a, b, c
    @val = a + b + c
    @val
  end

end

val = SomeClass.new 1, 2, 3

I need val to be 6 not initialized object.

Of course i can use val.val but that's another story.

share|improve this question
    
This makes no sense, new != initialize, in OOP a new classmethod must return the instance. Why don't you just use a classmethod if you're not interested in creating an instance of a class? –  tokland Nov 19 '12 at 13:24
    
From a design standpoint this is not a good idea. New should return a newly initialized object, doing otherwise is not obvious or intuitive to other programmers. Of course, if nobody else will see this code, it doesn't matter... until you look at it three months from now and wonder what is going on in the code. –  Catnapper Nov 19 '12 at 13:25
    
That's just an exercise and yes, i was advised to not use this on production. –  Bill Parker Nov 19 '12 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to override self.new method:

class SomeClass
  def self.new(*)
    instance = super
    instance.val
  end

  attr_reader :val

  def initialize a, b, c
    @val = a + b + c
    @val
  end

end

p SomeClass.new 1, 2, 3
#=> 6

When you create a instance of a class you are in fact calling self.new of that class which then call initialize method and return the initialized instance.

See live demo here

share|improve this answer
    
That did the trick, thank you. –  Bill Parker Nov 19 '12 at 15:12

initialize is a method just like any other method. Of course, it returns the return value, just like any other method.

What gave you the impression that it doesn't? You never call initialize in the code sample you provided, so how do you know what value it returns?

class SomeClass
  attr_reader :val

  def initialize a, b, c
    @val = a + b + c
    @val
  end

end

obj = SomeClass.allocate
val = obj.send :initialize, 1, 2, 3
# => 6
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for nice trick! However i need SomeClass.new to return the value without extra callings on initialized object. I'll update the question. –  Bill Parker Nov 19 '12 at 15:10
    
I still don't understand your question. You are asking "Why does initialize not return my value", but I just showed you that it does return its value. So, what exactly is your question? –  Jörg W Mittag Nov 19 '12 at 16:12
    
Sorry for confusion, the actual question is "Why SomeClass.new does not return my value". Question updated a while ago. –  Bill Parker Nov 19 '12 at 16:38
    
Well, that's trivial: you haven't changed SomeClass.new, so why would it return something different? –  Jörg W Mittag Nov 19 '12 at 17:28
    
I just rechecked the question and it still reads: "A bit confused about Ruby's initialize method. Why does not it return my value, as other methods do?" There's no mention of SomeClass.new other than the title. –  Jörg W Mittag Nov 19 '12 at 17:29

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