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I have the following problem. I have a base class and several classes inheriting from it. All those classes are sharing a very similar interface and will most probably not be required to overload most of the shared methods.

However, all of them are using different member objects that are derived from each other and share a very similar interface too.

class BaseClass
{
    protected:
        Com* com;

    public:
        void setReady()
        {
            com->setReady();
        }
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    protected:
        DerivedCom* com;
}

class Derived2Class : BaseClass
{
    protected:
        Derived2Com* com;
}

How can I enable DerivedClass to have setReady() run its version of com instead of the one inherited from BaseClass?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to have the multiple pointers? Can a DerivedClass have both a Com* and a DerivedCom* at the same time? If not, then reuse the member at the base level. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 19 '12 at 13:29
    
No, it can't. How would one do that then? – Nils Werner Nov 19 '12 at 13:50
    
See the answer by d909b. Add on top of that any function in DerivedXClass can use a pointer cast to transform the Com* into the appropriate DerivedCom* for a richer interface – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 19 '12 at 14:53
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Construct your instances with different implementations of Com. (Assuming DerivedCom implements Com)

class BaseClass
{
    protected:
        Com* com;

    public:
        BaseClass(Com* c = new Com) : com(c) 
        {}

        void setReady()
        {
            com->setReady();
        }
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public:
        DerivedClass() : BaseClass(new DerivedCom) 
        {}
}

class Derived2Class : BaseClass
{
    public:
        Derived2Class() : BaseClass(new Derived2Com) 
        {}
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Simple and to the point: If you don't have multiple Com objects, why keep multiple pointers? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 19 '12 at 13:37
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas Uhm, won't the base ctors allocate com, only to have the derived ctor override it and thus leak memory? – Nikos C. Nov 19 '12 at 13:40
    
@NikosC.: you are assuming that the pointer is allocated in construction. If you read the code in the answer above you will see that only the most derived type is allocating and passing it up the hierarchy. For each complete type there is a single allocation. It could even be the case that none of the constructors really allocate and the pointer is passed from client code. The more interesting question is how to use the Com* in the rest of the DerivedClass functions as a DerivedCom*, and static_cast/dynamic_cast would be an answer. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 19 '12 at 13:43
1  
I don't quite understand why your constructors for DerivedClass are named after BaseClass and how that would affect instantiating the objects. – Nils Werner Nov 19 '12 at 13:49
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas That looks suspicious to me. The internal com object is exposed that way. Perhaps a protected constructor would be better. Access in derived classes is quite easy though; all you need is a new private member: derivedCom(static_cast<derivedCom*>(com) so that there's no need to cast all the time throughout the code. – Nikos C. Nov 19 '12 at 13:51

A simple solution is to introduce a getCom() protected virtual function, that returns a Com* or Com&:

virtual Com* getCom()
{ return this->com; }

The child classes can override it and return their own Com-derived instance. Your setReady() function can then be implemented as:

void setReady()
{
    getCom()->setReady();
}

Your com member can then be made private, btw.

The drawback with this solution is that you'll have multiple Com-derived instances in the child classes.

share|improve this answer
    
While the claim of simplicity is ok (although I won't go as far as saying simplest, it is simple), I am a bit less inclined to call this the most widely used. The design has a core issue: a DerivedClass has a useless Com* through the base, which makes this a design issue. A better solution would be to reuse that pointer (which is protected) down through the hierarchy (See d909b's answer). – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 19 '12 at 13:37
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas You're right. It's subjective; just because I see it used most often doesn't make it so generally. I'll remove that bit. – Nikos C. Nov 19 '12 at 13:39

Maybe a class template might help you:

class BaseClass
{
protected:
    Com* com;

public:
    virtual void setReady()
    {
        com->setReady();
    }
};

template<typename T>
class ComDerived : public BaseClass {
protected:
    T* com;
public:
    void setReady()
    {
        com->setReady();
    }
};

class DerivedClass : public ComDerived<DerivedCom>
{

};

class Derived2Class : public ComDerived<Derived2Com>
{

};
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I have also answered the same idea template ;-) – olibre Nov 19 '12 at 13:33
    
In this case, wouldn't setReady have to be virtual? Also, I don't know the standard well enough to know if this would give you multiple Com objects in a DerivedClass... – Robert Mason Nov 19 '12 at 14:12
    
@RobertMason you're right, I based my example in OP's code; it should be virtual. As for the multiple com members, there is no problem about it. – mfontanini Nov 19 '12 at 15:09

Why not templated mother class?

template <typename T>
class BaseClass
{
    protected:
        T* com;

    public:
        void setReady()
        {
            com->setReady();
        }
};

class DerivedClass : BaseClass<DerivedCom>
{
};

class Derived2Class : BaseClass<Derived2Com>
{
};
share|improve this answer
    
Why not template... In general you don't want to do that, as now DerivedClass and Derived2Class are unrelated types that cannot be used polymorphically. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 19 '12 at 13:39
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: They can still be used polymorphically, just only statically so, thanks to template argument deduction. Consider template <class T> void foo(BaseClass<T> base) { base.setReady(); }: this is callable as foo(obj); so long as the actual type of obj can be deduced by the compiler at compile time. Although this limits the flexibility somewhat, in some cases (for example, in a dependency injection framework) this can be enough. – Robert Mason Nov 19 '12 at 13:53

To build on d909b's answer, I'd do something like:

class BaseClass {
private:
   virtual Com * alloc_com() {
      return new Com;
   }
   Com * com;
public:
   BaseClass() : com(alloc_com()) {}
   void setReady() {
      com->setReady();
   }
};

class DerivedClass {
private:
   virtual Com * alloc_com() override {
      return new DerivedCom;
   }
};

class Derived2Class {
private:
   virtual Com * alloc_com() override {
      return new Derived2Com;
   }
};

This works as long as DerivedCom publicly inherits from Com AND when Com has a virtual destructor. If Com does not have a virtual destructor, you also need to have a virtual dealloc_com function. Otherwise, you need to use a template or CRTP pattern, and then you're limited to cases where you are able to deduce the type of the object at compile time. If you know these are your only cases though, using templates will allow you to use the interface without adding virtual function call overhead.

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